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Amazing photos of Franklin King Beck home in Wilcox County, Alabama built ca. 1832

Photographs of the historic Franklin King Beck home in 1936, 1937 and today

Alex Bush, Photographer, January 7, 1937 FRONT (SOUTH) – Franklin King Beck House, 312 Clifton Street, Camden, Wilcox County, AL (Library of Congress) 


The Franklin King Beck house, also called the Beck-Darwin Home is located at 312 Clifton Road, Camden, Wilcox County, Alabama.

Alex Bush, Photographer, January 7, 1937 EAST END OF REAR – Franklin King Beck House, 312 Clifton Street, Camden, Wilcox County, AL (Library of Congress)

Alex Bush, Photographer, January 7, 1937 FRONT (SOUTH) GENERAL VIEW – Franklin King Beck House, 312 Clifton Street, Camden, Wilcox County, AL (Library of Congress)

The date of construction is believed to have been built ca. 1832 and is one of the few homes in Wilcox County exemplifying the T-plan. It is an excellent example of a Greek Revival Cottage.

E. W. Russell, Photographer June 16, 1936 DOOR AND WINDOW TREATMENT ON EAST END OF FRONT PORCH – Franklin King Beck House, Wilcox County, AL

E. W. Russell, Photographer, June 16, 1936 VIEW OF WEST END OF FRONT PORCH – Franklin King Beck House (Library of Congress)

The home was owned by Franklin King Beck, the nephew of William Rufus King. Franklin King Beck was married to Martha Tait, daughter of James Asbury Tait and the grand-daughter of Judge Charles Tait, the first Federal Judge of Alabama.

Alex Bush, Photographer, August 31, 1936 VIEW IN PARLOR (SO. AND EAST WALLS) (Library of Congress)

Alex Bush, Photographer, August 31, 1936 VIEW IN SOUTH EAST CORNER OF BED ROOM SHOWING DOOR AND PART OF MANTEL (Library of Congress)

Alex Bush, Photographer, August 31, 1936 DOORS IN SO. AND EAST WALLS IN BED ROOM – Franklin King Beck House (Library of Congress)

 

Franklin King Beck was a delegate to the Alabama Secession Convention and a Colonel during the War.

E. W. Russell, Photographer, June 16, 1936, CLOSE-UP OF FRONT (SOUTH) – Franklin King Beck House

He died near the end of the war when a cannon ball struck the limb of a tree, and glancing downward passed through Col. Beck’s thigh and killed his horse. He survived this wound but a few moments.

Alex Bush, Photographer, January 7, 1937 FRONT (SOUTH) GENERAL VIEW – Franklin King Beck House, 312 Clifton Street, Camden, Wilcox County, AL (Library of Congress)

The home is privately owned this is what the Beck-Darwin-Jones Home looks like today (Wilcox Area Chamber of Commerce)

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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One comment

  1. Ooo! i have both Becks and Kings in my tree. I will have to look again to see if I’m related to the home’s former occupants.

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