Days Gone By - stories from the past

Andalusia has streets named after Andrew Jackson’s notches on trees

(Have you ever wondered where the unusual name of some of Andalusia’s street names such as Three Notch Street comes from?  The name goes back to Andrew Jackson’s visit after the War of 1812.)


Andalusia is the county seat of Covington County, in the central part of the county and about 3 miles from the Conecuh River.

Covington County Courthouse ca. 1930

Andalusia courthouse

“The area which now composes Covington County, Alabama, was originally inhabited by the Creek Indians. There are Indian mounds, arrowheads, and other relics to be found here. The county is located in South Alabama.

aNDALUSIA

“After the War of 1812, Andrew Jackson, legend has it, came from South Carolina and traveled through this area in route to New Orleans. He cut three notches on trees as he passed through this wilderness to enable him to find his way back. Andalusia has an East Three Notch Street and a South Three Notch Street. Troy has a North Three Notch Street and a South Three Notch Street. These streets are supposed to lie on the famous “Three Notch Trail.” It was incorporated by the legislature in 1901.three notch sign

Three Notch Museum, Andalusia, Alabama

The Three Notch Museum exhibits an historic post office and log cabin and objects and other items related to Andalusia and Covington County.

Three notch museum

In 1916, there were three Banks: the Bank of Andalusia, the First National Bank, and the Andalusia Bank & Trust Co. Industries were: packing plant, established in 1916, valued at $150,000; cottonseed oil mill; two turpentine distilleries; a lumber plant, 12 miles south of the town, incorporated, with $1.000,000 capital.

In 1847, the name of this community was New Site, and its selection as the county seat was due to the destruction of Montezuma, the old county seat, by an overflow of Conecuh River. The land on which Andalusia is located was entered by John W. Robinson, who gave 40 acres to secure for the town the permanent establishment of the county seat. In 1878 the courthouse and all the county records were destroyed by fire.

A new building was completed in 1916, at a cost of $10,000. Among the early settlers of this section were Jeremiah Jones, W. T. Acree, Lorenzo Adams, Alford Holley, Ephraim Liles and George Snowden. In the establishment of the town, a lot for a union church was set aside. It is now the property of the Baptists. On the Conecuh River, near Andalusia, there are several large Indian mounds.

SOURCES

  1. Brewer, Alabama (1872), p. 202; Northern Alabama (1888), p. 233
  2. City of Andalusia

 

 

Shop Amazon Gift Cards – Instant Delivery or Free One-Day Shipping

Vinegar of the Four Thieves was a recipe that was known for its antibacterial, antiviral, antiseptic and antifungal properties for years. It was even used to cure the Bubonic Plague. See Thomas Jefferson’s recipe in VINEGAR OF THE FOUR THIEVES: Recipes & curious tips from the past With Bonus: First two chapters of novel Ribbon of Love

VINEGAR OF THE FOUR THIEVES: Recipes & curious tips from the past


By (author): Donna R Causey
List Price: Price Not Listed
Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

Tags:

17 comments

  1. Now you’re in my stomping grounds! Very familiar with South and Southeast Alabama. Great old courthouse in Andalusia, my birthplace.

  2. Hank Barfoot

    I know this area pretty well my dad’s stomping grounds. I was there too for a short time.

  3. Kathy L Morrow

    Suzette Hooper Øbêy Anna

  4. Keith Smith

    We have a Three Notch Road in Mobile.

  5. Charles Moore

    We lived near a Three Notch Road in Georgia. I never thought about the origin of its name

  6. Lester Smith

    AND IT LOOK LIKE THAT TO DAY ,,

    1. Russell Kirkpatrick

      Yup yup, been there many times. Where Sarah Hayse Kirkpatrick is from.

  7. Wm Flake Joiner

    If my understanding of Alabama History is correct, Andrew JACKSON had nothing to do with the Three Notch Road. It was laid out with the ‘three notches’ in 1824, following orders from the War Department in Washington. Some of the marked trees were still alive in Pike County during my childhood.

  8. MIke Armstrong

    i can remember hunting in that area before it became a state park.my dad would drag my sleepy self to the car.we would go to someones house and have breakfast.my first “brains and eggs” and the man of the house would drive us out to the woods and drop us off.boy,those were the days.

  9. Janet Money

    Meighan Reynolds interesting

  10. Angela Fulmer Ash

    There’s a Three Notch Street in Troy, AL too. Mary Evalyn Ferrell

  11. Greg Dickey

    There are 3 Notch streets in a lot of towns that US 29 runs through

  12. Greg Dickey

    There was still one of the trees south of Andalusia that still bore the 3 notches as late as 1999 , don’t know if it still is

  13. Roy G Hicks

    One of the 3 old military roads from 200 years ago, the Three – Chopped Way

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *