Days Gone By - stories from the past

Arlington – the only antebellum house left in Birmingham has ties to the city’s founders. [photographs & film]

Arlington in Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama is a wonderful example of Greek Revival architecture which dates back to the 1840s. It is located on six acres in Old Elyton which was the first permanent County Seat of Jefferson County. It was originally called ‘The Grove’ and was built by Judge William S. Mudd, one of the founders of Birmingham.


Arlington is the only antebellum mansion remaining in Birmingham.

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Front (North) and West Elevation – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT (NORTH) AND WEST ELEVATION - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

During the end of the Civil War, General James Wilson arrived with over 13,000 troops and used Arlington for his headquarters while he planned the destruction of the Confederate iron furnaces and the military school at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.  General Wilson camped on the grounds instead of within the house, thus sparing damage to the house.

Some believe General Wilson spared the mansion was because Judge Mudd and General Wilson were both Masons. Judge Mudd also opposed secession. However, he supported the South during the Civil War after hostilities broke out.

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Rear Hall (General view) Showing stairs – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 REAR HALL (GENERAL VIEW) SHOWING STAIRS - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington Alex Bush, Photographer, March 5, 1937 Mantel On West Wall of Parlor – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington Alex Bush, Photographer, March 5, 1937 MANTEL ON WEST WALL OF PARLOR - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

After the Civil War the property went through several owners. In 1902, Arlington became the home of Robert S. Munger and over the next twenty year he added plumbing and electric lights as well as other renovations. He had another structure moved across the street behind the main house which was used for a kitchen, dining room, sun parlor and sleeping quarters. Mr. Munger was known to have had one of the first ‘motor cars’ in Birmingham.

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 View across main hall into dining room- Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 VIEW ACROSS MAIN HALL INTO DINING ROOM - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington –  Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Front Elevtion dining room and kitchen – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT ELEVATION DINING ROOM AND KITCHEN - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Close-up of Main Entrance – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF MAIN ENTRANCE - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 West Elevation (General view) – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlingtonn - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 WEST ELEVATION (GENERAL VIEW) - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Front of Hall (General View) – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT OF HALL (GENERAL VIEW) - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 East Elevation of Main Building – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 EAST ELEVATION OF MAIN BUILDING - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Front Elevation (General view) – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT ELEVATION (GENERAL VIEW) - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Looking East on Second Floor Porch  – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 LOOKING EAST ON SECOND FLOOR PORCH - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington – Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 View of Garden and Summer House  – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington - Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 VIEW OF GARDEN AND SUMMER HOUSE - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington 1997 – interior view, viewing panel cut into the floor of the music room – Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALArlington 1997 - INTERIOR VIEW, VIEWING PANEL CUT INTO THE FLOOR OF THE MUSIC ROOM - Arlington Place, 331 Cotton Avenue, Southwest, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Arlington – interior view, music room located at the Northeast corner of the house on the first floor, looking to the fireplace in the east wall Arlington INTERIOR VIEW, MUSIC ROOM LOCATED AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF THE HOUSE ON THE FIRST FLOOR, LOOKING TO THE FIREPLACE IN THE EAST WALL

Arlington –  Second floor bedroom – southeast corner of the houseArlington - view of SE bedroom - SE corner of the house

The mansion has been lovingly restored and is open to the public for tours. An Admission is charged. The Restored Garden Room is available for private and club rental. Click here for more information.

Read more stories of pioneers in ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Pioneers: A Collection of Lost & Forgotten Stories 

Stories include:

  • The Yazoo land fraud
  • Daily life as an Alabama pioneer
  • The capture and arrest of Vice-president Aaron Burr
  • The early life of William Barrett Travis, the hero of the Alamo
  • Description of Native Americans of early Alabama including the visit by Tecumseh
  • Treaties and building the first roads in Alabama.

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Pioneers: A Collection of Lost & Forgotten Stories


By (author): Donna R. Causey
List Price: Price Not Listed
Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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10 comments

  1. Judge William S. Mudd’s wife, Florence Earle, was daughter of Dr. Samuel S. Earle who came with his wife from South Carolina to Elyton about 1823-24 – very prominent family in Elyton, and later in Birmingham.

  2. What a magnificient piece of history this home is. I hope it is always preserved for future
    history buffs to enjoy.

  3. Gayla Plott

    I was married & had our reception here. So lovely.

  4. Trish Erzen Lacefield

    Beautiful place. I haven’t been there in almost 30 years when I used the venue for a work related event. Would so love to see it again.

  5. Tere Vermillion Sizemore

    We go to Arlington every year for the Christmas open house.

  6. Lynn Brockman Ellis

    Lived in Bham for the first 35 years of my life and only visited this place twice: as a youngster with out-of-town visiting relatives and as a wedding guest when my 6th grade teacher married there. I think it’s time for another visit!!

  7. When I was in high school in the late-60’s I volunteered as a costumed docent at Arlington. My mother made me a summer and winter dress and I worked as much as Mrs. Lackmond would allow. It’s the best job I ever had!

  8. Jane Wynn

    I know I’m never going to be able to get there to see this beautiful presentation but you know one thing I could have read it but you kept putting this confounded thing up about the email stuff you know can you let people just enjoy reading about the beautiful place thank you for sharing that one picture with me have a blessed day

  9. Debbie Wood

    Beautiful, toured many years ago!!!

  10. Sherry Hughes Garner

    I recognized it immediately. My grandparents used to live on Cotton Ave. in B’ham, where this is located. We’d walk to the Elyton Baptist Church on Sundays and we’d walk right past it.

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