Days Gone By - stories from the past

Atmore was first named Williams Station – It was almost named Carney

October 24th, 2015 Atmore residents will turn back their clocks to 1866 when their community was named Williams Station. Join the fun day of family entertainment. “An easy one hour drive from Mobile, Pensacola and Baldwin County, Williams Station Day is packed with great venues to fit every taste. For the young and young at heart we offer an old fashioned sampling of southern heritage seasoned with the blues, arts and crafts, cane milling and heritage displays.” Read more at Atmore Chamber of Commerce


The city of Atmore is located in Escambia County, Alabama.

Previous to the coming of the railroad, the locality of where present day Atmore is today was settled by William L. Williams. He had an establishment was at the crossing of the Monroeville and Pensacola, and the Brewton and Bay Minette public roads.

1930s business section on North Main Street in Atmore, Alabama1930s business section on North Main Street in Atmore, Alabama – postcard  (Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Upon the completion of the railroad, the station was called Williams Station in honor of the first Williams settlers. In 1895, the name was changed to Atmore, for C. P. Atmore, general passenger agent of the Louisville & Nashville Railroad, who was a friend of a prominent citizen Mr. Carney. At first, there was talk of naming the town Carney, who owned a sawmill in town, but since Mr. Carney had a brother who established a town nearby, the town decided to let Mr. Carney name the town.

Residential_section_on_South_Main_Street_in_Atmore_AlabamaResidential section on South Main Street in Atmore, Alabama 1930s (Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Atmore also has a rich Native American past. The former homer and the grave of the famous chief, William Weatherford are on Little River across the line in the northern part of Baldwin County.

Atmore has another claim to fame with having the first high school female football. Read more about her at:  The first female football player, a forgotten story from Atmore, Alabama

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) – A novel inspired by the experiences of the Cottingham family who immigrated from the Eastern Shore of Virginia to Alabama

Discordance:: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)


Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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4 comments

  1. Tela Sue Sullivan

    I lived there several years ago- like the pics

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