Days Gone By - stories from the past

Beautiful [photographs] of home of Benjamin P. Worthington, pioneer and a founder of Birmingham, Alabama

These historic photographs take you back in time. Benjamin Pinkney “Pink” Worthington was a pioneer of the area around Avondale/Lakeview area of Birmingham, Alabama. This house was located at the intersection of 30th and 6th Avenue South on approximately 800 acres.


Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Front (North) and West Elevation – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 FRONT (NORTH) AND WEST ELEVATION - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

 

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Rear (South) Elevation – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 REAR (SOUTH) ELEVATION - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Rear Elevation, view from South East – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 REAR ELEVATION. VIEW FROM SOUTH EAST - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Stairway to rear of main hall  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 STAIRWAY TO REAR OF MAIN HALL - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Close-up of Main Entrance  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF MAIN ENTRANCE - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Close-up of column on front  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 CLOSE-UP OF COLUMN ON FRONT - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Looking North in Main Hall  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 LOOKING NORTH IN MAIN HALL - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Window detail on South wall of front porch – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 WINDOW DETAIL ON SOUTH WALL OF FRONT PORCH - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Double doors in N. E. Room, First Floor  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 DOUBLE DOORS IN N.E. ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Mantel on East wall of N.E. room – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 MANTEL ON EAST WALL OF N. E. ROOM - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

Alex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 Mantel on North wall of N. E. room, first floor  – Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, ALAlex Bush, Photographer, March 4, 1937 MANTEL ON NORTH WALL OF N.E. ROOM, FIRST FLOOR - Benjamin Pinckney Worthington House, Sixth Avenue South, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

See best-selling books by Donna R Causey

 

As a family historian, do you have friends and family ask you how to get started in family research? This is a hard question to answer in a few minutes. Refer them to the book below to help them get started in this fun hobby. Purchase several – Books make great Christmas gifts!

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By (author): Donna R Causey
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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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12 comments

  1. Trish Martin Chisling

    Robert Milwood Janet Clarke Larry Millwood

  2. Brian Chatham

    Benjamin Pinckney Worthington was born in Kentucky on November 19, 1814. He married Caroline Mitchell of South Carolina in Jefferson County, Alabama. They had eleven children. He owned an 800-acre farm in what is now the Avondale area of Birmingham. The Worthington home was a large, eight room structure with high ceilings, a veranda, and six columns at the front. It was equipped with the first water system in the area supplied by springs later submerged under Rushton Park. A portion of land originally purchased by the Elyton Land Company was sometimes called “Pink Worthington’s frog pond”. After the Civil War B. P. Worthington intended to move his family to South America, but following a shipwreck off the coast of Cuba and a two-year sojourn in Florida he returned to Jefferson County and to his former home. In 1871 he was one of seven people who incorporated the National Bank of Birmingham with a paid-up capital of $50,000. He died on November 19, 1884 and is buried in Birmingham’s Oak Hill Cemetery. (Source: B’ham Public Library)

    This house sat on 6th Avenue South. This photo was taken in 1933 by Alex Bush. Part of the HABS collection by the Library of Congress. The house was torn down in 1953.

  3. Becky Davis Gibson

    It looks like the house from fried green tomatoes?

  4. Gail Ansell Deason

    This is a great house! Love it

  5. Molly Sharpe

    Hope they recycled the lumber from the house.

  6. Lived in this house when I was a little fellow from 1940 to 1948. There was three other families that lived there with us. We had two of the first floor rooms on the left side of the looking at the front of the home.

  7. Big house but all I can think about is how COLD it surely was!

  8. Brian Chatham

    Benjamin Pinckney Worthington was born in Kentucky on November 19, 1814. He married Caroline Mitchell of South Carolina in Jefferson County, Alabama. They had eleven children. He owned an 800-acre farm in what is now the Avondale area of Birmingham. The Worthington home was a large, eight room structure with high ceilings, a veranda, and six columns at the front. It was equipped with the first water system in the area supplied by springs later submerged under Rushton Park. A portion of land originally purchased by the Elyton Land Company was sometimes called “Pink Worthington’s frog pond”. After the Civil War B. P. Worthington intended to move his family to South America, but following a shipwreck off the coast of Cuba and a two-year sojourn in Florida he returned to Jefferson County and to his former home. In 1871 he was one of seven people who incorporated the National Bank of Birmingham with a paid-up capital of $50,000. He died on November 19, 1884 and is buried in Birmingham’s Oak Hill Cemetery. (Source: B’ham Public Library)

    This house sat on 6th Avenue South. This photo was taken in 1933 by Alex Bush. Part of the HABS collection by the Library of Congress. The house was torn down in 1953.

  9. Joan Williams

    I’m related to him. He was brother to my 4th great grandfather. Thanks for sharing.

  10. Rick Bozeman

    There’s a large empty lot at 30th and 6th these days. May have been the location of the house. SW corner I think.

  11. Brian Chatham

    That is – was – a beautiful house. Wish it could have been moved to a different location, rather than torn down.

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