Days Gone By - stories from the past

The county seat of Bullock County, Alabama has many beautiful historic homes

Union Springs, the county seat of Bullock County, is centrally located and has a charming history. It was settled thirty years prior to Bullock County being created. The town was called Union Springs because of its location on the Cunnennuggee Ridge at a point where four springs form sources for four streams the Conecuh River, Oakfuske River, Old Town Creek and Cabahatchee Creek.


Early pioneers

Pioneers to Union Springs were the Normans, Powells, Picketts, Mabsons, Farleys, Sessions, Stakeleys, McCalls, Fielders, McAndrews, Pierces, and others.

M. N. Eley, father of B. T. and F. H. Eley had settled in the area prior to majority of settlers and owned most of the land where the town of Union Springs is located today. He sold it to a land company that made a survey and proposed to call the town Bienville. Dr. Coleman built the first log home in Union Springs.

Howe-Roughton House, County Road 14, High Ridge, Bullock County, AL 1935 (by photographer W. N. Manning -Library of Congress)

Howe-Roughton House, County Road 14, High Ridge, Bullock County, AL 1935 (by photographer W. N. Manning -Library of Congress)

Governor William Dorsey Jelks resided in Union Springs in his early life. He later lived in the town house of Sen. and Mrs. T. S. Frazer.
“The home of Hugh Foster, who served as deputy governor of the Federal Reserve Bank until his death, is in Union Springs. Dr. Sterling Foster built the home in the years 1852 to 1856. The Fosters trace their ancestry back to Lyredic, the “Great Forester” of Flanders, who lived 800 A. D., and to Sir Richard Foresters, who accompanied William the Conqueror of England in 1066. The Fosters came to Alabama from South Carolina and Georgia..”1

The landscape of the grounds around the old home is lovely with its rear garden and great oaks.1

Mrs. Hugh Foster House, 201 Kennon Street, Union Springs, Bullock County, AL Laurel Hill July 17, 1935 front view east (photographer W. N. Manning, Library of Congress)

Mrs. Hugh Foster House, 201 Kennon Street, Union Springs, Bullock County, AL  Laurel Hill July 17, 1935 front view east (photographer W. N. Manning, Library of Congress)

Each room had three exposures

The brother of Sterling, Dr. James Madison Foster, built his home across town to give three exposures to every room. The daughter of Dr. Foster, Mrs. Andrew Jackson Pittman, related how the house was designed and cut piece by piece in Columbus, shipped to Suspension, and thence to the site via the wagon route. Some glass panels in the entrance transom, etc., were imported.Bullock county historic marker

Flute and cane are in the Smithsonian

It was told that during the War Between the States, “the Yankee soldiers came to the Fosters home in Union Springs demanding food and attempting the home’s destruction with fire; in later days after the War-Between-the-States, here stamped Gen. Longstreet, who carried $20-gold pieces in his heavy cane and who played fairy music on his glass flute, as a refugee, and later as tutor to the Foster boys. That flute and cane are said to be in the Smithsonian Institution today.”2

The home of Captain Pickett and Mrs. Virginia Powell Pickett, Del Rosa, was typical of antebellum times with its wide veranda and beautiful garden that provided a natural setting for true Southern hospitality.

Other plantations

Along the Ridge Road near Union Springs were plantations owned by old families such as the Martins, Hooks, Vaughns, Hubbards, Childs, and Boyds. These names appear with early dates in Sardis Cemetery along with other names such as Devoe, Ruse, Worthington, Paulk, and Cade.

 

SOURCES

1Griswold, Elizabeth Black, History of Bullock County, (term paper written in 1937 for a class in Southern History at Alabama College, Montevallo, Alabama)

1Griswold, Elizabeth Black, History of Bullock County, (term paper written in 1937 for a class in Southern History at Alabama College, Montevallo, Alabama)

1Griswold, Elizabeth Black, History of Bullock County, (term paper written in 1937 for a class in Southern History at Alabama College, Montevallo, Alabama)

2Birmingham News, “Historic Union Springs, in Bullock” –1935

RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel of Colonial America  – the true story of religion in America –Inspired by true historical events, Mary and Henry Pattenden flee to America to escape persecution –  It is almost impossible to put the book down until completion. – Dr. Don P. Brandon, Retired Professor, Anderson University 

RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love Book 1): Book 1 in Tapestry of Love Series


By (author): Donna R Causey
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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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4 comments

  1. Jordan Mahaffey

    Wes Mahaffey Joni Mahaffey Phelps

  2. Anyone remember Dr. William Henry Harrison? His wife Emma Houston Harrison? Dr. Harrison died in Dec. 1928.

  3. None of the photographs came through on my server, what a shame, because I love looking at the old houses and mansions.

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