Days Gone By - stories from the past

This was an ingenious way to get water in Bullock County in the early days – [old photographs]

The people of Bullock County, Alabama were very creative when it came to survival as this invention to bring water down from the mountain shows.


Railroad To Spring Showing Water Pouring Into Bucket  Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL

Railroad To Spring Showing Water Pouring Into Bucket Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, 2

Railroad To Spring Showing Water Pouring Into Bucket Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road,

Settlement followed the Creek Indian cession

The early history of Bullock county is identified with that of the counties from which it was formed. Settlement followed the final Creek cession of 1832.

In January, 1837, the Creek Indians then being removed from the country, committed some depredations, which brought about an engagement between them and the whites, about three miles west of Midway, then in Barbour. One white man, Walter Patterson was killed, and Judge W. R. Cowan lost his left arm. A few others were slightly wounded, and several horses were killed. General William Wellborn was in command. It is not known that any Indians were killed.

An excellent citizenship filled its rich lands, coming from other states as well as from adjacent counties. Handsome homes were located on the plantations and in the nearby villages as can be seen by the photographs below

Historic Berry-Braswell House, County Road 14, High Ridge, Bullock County, AL from E. B. Braswell estated, photographed by W. N. Manning June 15, 1935  – E. B. Braswell was probably Elbert Burl Braswell died Jan. 12, 1935

Berry-Braswell house June 1935 by manning

Rear And Side View, S.W. – Berry-Braswell House June 15, 1935REAR AND SIDE VIEW, S.W. - Berry-Braswell House June 15, 1935

Named in honor of CSA soldier Col. Edward C. Bullock

Bullock County was named in honor of Col. Edward C. Bullock of Barbour County, colonel of the 18th Alabama Infantry Regiment, C. S. A., who died later in the War.

The act establishing the county named Ames T. Norman, Joel T. Crawford and Malachi Ivey as commissioners to hold an election for officers, and also to hold an election for the selection of a county seat. These elections were held in 1867, and Union Springs was chosen.

Berry-Braswell House Front Door photographed by W. N. Manning June 15, 1935Berry - Braswell House, Front Door - June 15, 1935

Berry-Braswell2 House Front Door photographed by W. N. Manning June 15, 1935

Berry-Braswell Fireplace in N W room photographed by W. N. Manning June 15, 1935Berry braswell N. W front room june 15, 1935

No positive locations of Indian towns found

While evidences of occupancy are met within a few instances, no positive locations of Indian towns can be made. Tchonanagi, an Upper Creek village, was located in the county, giving its name to Chunnennuggee Ridge, but location and other details are wanting.

The territory of the county includes few large streams, and is in the extreme southern section of the Upper Creek territory. It was evidently not very thickly peopled.

Mounds were found on the plantation of J. H. Fielder 10 miles from Union Springs. Village sites were recorded near the Central of Georgia Railway, between Union Springs and Guerryton, and some on the road to Eufaula, but the latter is doubtless of Lower Creek affiliation.

Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL W. N. Manning, Photographer, July 17, 1935Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL W. N. Manning, Photographer, July 17, 1935

Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL W. N. Manning, Photographer, July 17, 1935Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL W. N. Manning, view in hall of back

Mantel And Fireplace In S. W. Front Room – Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, ALMANTEL AND FIREPLACE IN S. W. FRONT ROOM - Octavia Adkinson House, Wilson Road, Peachburg, Bullock County, AL

Chunnennuggee Ridge divides Bullock County

Bullock County lies in the southeastern section of Alabama, south of Macon and Montgomery counties, bounded on the east by Russell and Barbour, on the south by Barbour and Pike, and on the west by Pike and Montgomery counties. Chunnennuggee Ridge divides the county into two parts.

This ridge is an important physiographic feature, forming the watershed of three river systems. It also separates the two main topographic divisions of the county, that is, the “prairie region” or northern section, and the “sandy-lands region” to the south. North of the ridge is a belt of low hills and irregular ridges with a network of V-shaped valleys and wet weather streams. This is locally known as the “hill-prairie” country.

The true prairie lies to the south, and its typical development from Union Springs northwestward to the Montgomery county line is one of low relief. The elevations along the Central of Georgia Railway vary from 260 to about 530 feet above sea level. High Ridge in the southwest section is apparently the highest point, and the place where Line Creek leaves the county is probably the lowest.

SOURCES

  1. History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, written by Thomas McAdory Owen, was published in 1921 by the S.J. Clarke Publishing Company.
  2. Library of Congress

Historical Reference Books

All Books by Donna R. Causey

Ribbon of Love: A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love) (Volume 1) – the true story of religion in America –

Review: Author Donna R. Causey, native of Alabama, takes real characters, facts, dates and places and creates a story about life as it might have happened.

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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10 comments

  1. James Ball

    Thanks for your invitation to like, I really enjoy history especially Alabama history.

  2. Annette M Nicholson

    I really enjoyed this. Thank you.

    1. Alabama Pioneers

      Thank you for the feedback. I enjoyed writing it.

  3. Karen Smith Daigle

    A lot of my kid folks come from Bullock/Barbour County. This is awesome!

  4. Have visited/lived in Bullock County all of my nearly 75 years. It is a special place

  5. Julia Hopper Jacks

    The pictures are great.

    1. Alabama Pioneers

      Thanks Julia. We enjoy discovering and sharing them on the site.

    2. Julia Hopper Jacks

      Please keep posting, they are wonderful.

  6. Debbie Howard

    Love all the pics you share.

  7. Phyllis Harris

    Love the photos. Larry I have some great photos of the jug shop where Pounds Pottery was made back in the late 1800’s in Rock Mills. Mark Head has started having a pottery show at the old Mark Head Country Store on Wehadkee Creek in Rock Mills in September each year. I happened to be down there visiting the first show. They had the Pounds family pottery on display. It was really neat. I remember Wilner Pounds who started Pounds pottery.

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