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Fierce battle took place in Alabama on November 3, 1813

BATTLE OF TALLASEEHATCHEE

Also called Battle of Tallushatchee

(Excerpt transcribed from History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography, written by Thomas McAdory Owen, was published in 1921 by the S.J. Clarke Publishing Company)


The Battle of Tallaseehatchee was the first of several battles of Gen. Andrew Jackson’s army in his campaign against the Indians in the Creek Indian War of 1813-14. It was fought November 3, 1813, between the hostile Creek Indians, collected in the town of Tallaseehatchee, and the forces of Gen. Jackson, under the immediate command of Gen. John Coffee.

Battle of Tallushatchee

Jackson had difficulty moving his army

Gen. Jackson was moving his army with difficulty, owing to much-needed supplies. Gen. Coffee had destroyed Black Warrior’s Town, and Col. Dyer had burned the town of Littafuchee.

The army now had reached Ten Islands on the Coosa River, and Gen. Jackson began planning the erection of Fort Strother.

Creek Indian Battles (The Pictorial Field Book of the War of 1812)

Coffee directed to advance on Tallaseehatchee

Gen. Coffee was directed to advance on Tallaseehatchee with 920 men. He was accompanied by Richard Brown and a company of Creeks and Cherokees. The town was situated near the head of the creek of that name, about three miles southwest of Jacksonville. It had about 100 families, and a fighting force of 120 warriors, had only recently been increased by 300 warriors, brought together from the towns below, making an Indian force of 420 fighting men.

Gen. Coffee surrounded the town about sunrise of November 3. The engagement was swift and bloody. Not an Indian asked to be spared.

There is some discrepancy in the accounts of those engaged, but the Indian killed were 186 warriors who were counted and 18 Indian women. A number were never counted. Some escaped and fled toward Oakfushee. Gen. Coffee’s losses were five killed and 41 wounded.

Eighty-four women and children and fourteen hopelessly crippled warriors were taken prisoners. The prisoners were sent to Huntsville. On the same day, Gen. Coffee returned to headquarters.

Used bow and arrows

Of their arms and equipment in this battle. Brewer says—”A noticeable circumstance in connection with this battle is that the Indians were all armed with a bow and quiver of arrows, besides guns, which showed that they had taken to heart the advice of Tecumseh to throw aside the arts they had learned from the whites, and return to their primitive customs.”

Buell says, p. 304: “An interesting feature of this encounter was the fact that it was Coffee’s first battle. In his conduct of it, however, he exhibited skill and precision worthy a veteran of many fields. Coffee was an instinctive soldier, an intuitive general. Long after when his native capacity had been developed in many hard-fought encounters, including the battle of the 23rd below New Orleans, Gen. Jackson said of him: ‘John Coffee is a consummate commander. He was born so. But he is so modest that he doesn’t know it.'”

On the death of Gen. Coffee in 1834, Gov. William Carroll of Tennessee said of him in a funeral eulogy: “In view of all the circumstances, I had rather have been the hero of Tallaseehatchee than of the Horseshoe Bend. I had almost said New Orleans itself! It was the first battle of the Creek campaign; the first battle fought by any troops under Andrew Jackson’s command. Upon its issue depended in great measure the morale of our troops, their confidence in their leaders and the buoyancy of spirit that would serve them to endure the indescribable fatigues and privations to which they were subjected.”— Buell, p. 305.

References.—Pickett, History of Alabama (Owen’s ed., 1900), p. 652; Brewer, Alabama (1872), p. 152; Parton,Life of Jackson (1861), vol. 1, pp. 436-440; Buell, History of Andrew Jackson (1904), vol. 1, pp. 302-305; Eaton,Life of Jackson (1824), pp. 53-55; (Eaton), Memoirs of Andrew Jackson (1848), pp. 48-49; Jenkins, Life of Jackson (1852), pp. 65-67; Frost, Pictorial Life of Jackson (1847), pp. 132-137; Colyar, Life and Times of Jackson (1904), vol. 1, pp. 127-128.

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Confrontation:: Lost & Forgotten Stories (Volume 4)

Some stores include:

  1. Tecumseh Causes Earthquake
  2. Terrified Settlers Abandon Farms
  3. Survivor Stories From Fort Mims Massacre
  4. Hillabee Massacre
  5. Threat of Starvation Men Turn To Mutiny
  6. Red Eagle After The War

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

18 comments

  1. Steve White

    The sign for the battle is not at the actual site which is on private land. Some new evidence points to a massacre instead of a battle.

  2. Where exactly is the Sign located?? I live in Jacksonville, approximately at the location of where the battle took place (Hwy 21 about 2.5-3 miles south of town, across from RMC Hospital and near where Whites Gap Road intersects with Hwy 21); Tallaseehatchee Creek actually runs right behind my house. Wondering if my private land is where the battle, or part of it, occurred.

    1. The land I live on is haunted….truthfully.

  3. Jon Terry Paschal

    You didn’t finish the story !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1. What?

  4. I would also like information on where the village was actually located if anyone knows.Thanks

  5. Janis Gilbreath Martin

    Thanks for sharing this informative post

  6. Marie Wehunt Frazier

    How could our Native ancestors possibly fight the fire power of the army. I pray Andrew Jackson is burning in the devils he’ll today – this was America’s holocaust

    1. I agree with. Marie. I am a creek decendent

    2. No doubt that he is. For what he did to the Native Americans, he will be tormented in Hell for eternity!

    1. Colin Nelson

      Im gonna go see this tomorrow

      1. Colin Nelson….did you go?? which site??

  7. Update from further research: The historical marker is actually about 10-12 miles away (as the crow flies) from the actual site of the battle; the marker is on US Hwy 431 at mile marker 244, just north of Alexandria. The battle site is to the east on private lands, across from RMC-Jacksonville Hospital off AL Hwy 21 at 2.5 miles south of the Jacksonville downtown Square; this is where the village was, at the headwaters of Tallasseehatchee Creek.

    1. However according to Historical Marker Database (https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?MarkerID=36554) there is a stone tablet in Alexandria off of Hwy 144, not far from the Hwy 431 marker, that was erected by Daughters of American Revolution on the one-hundred year anniversary of the battle (11-3-1913).
      Ms. Causey, if you read these comments, can you clarify on this information? Where did you get your info on the location being 3 miles southwest of Jacksonville?

  8. Stephen Glover Rowe

    Attn: Ms. Donna Causey, The historical marker shown is on US Hwy 431 at mile marker 244, just north of Alexandria, AL. The battle site described in this article is 10-12 miles to the east off AL Hwy 21 on private lands, across from RMC-Jacksonville Hospital at 2.5 miles south of the Jacksonville downtown Square; as you are saying, this is supposedly where the village was, at the headwaters of Tallasseehatchee Creek.
    However according to the Historical Marker Database (https://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?MarkerID=36554) there is a stone tablet in Alexandria off of Hwy 144,(not far from the Hwy 431 marker) that was erected by Daughters of American Revolution (Anniston, AL) on the one-hundred year anniversary of the battle (11-3-1913).
    Ms. Causey, can you comment on this information? In your research for this article from your book Alabama Footprints: Confrontation (pg 63), where did you get your info on the location of Tallasseehatchee village being 3 miles southwest of Jacksonville at the headwaters of the creek by the same name? I happen to live on the land in Jacksonville which you are describing, but I am confused by the DAR marker located in Alexandria. I appreciate any clarification and help you can shed on this.

    1. Alabama Pioneers

      Hi Stephen. I don’t know anything about the marker but the source for the transcribed information in the article is from History of Alabama and Dictionary Biography, Volume II, 1921 by Thomas McAdory Owen who founded the Alabama Department of Archives and History. This excerpt is from his description of the Battle of Tallaseehatchee. “The army now had reached Ten Islands on the Coosa River, and Gen. Jackson began planning the erection of Fort Strother. Gen. Coffee was directed to advance on Tallaseehatchee with 920 men. He was accompanied .by Richard Brown and a company of Creeks and Cherokees. The town was situated near the head of the creek of that name, about three miles southwest of Jacksonville, It had about 100 families, and a fighting force of 120 warriors, had only recently been increased by 300 warriors, brought together from the towns below, making an Indian force of 420 fighting men. Gen. Coffee surrounded the town about sunrise of November 3. The engagement was swift and bloody. Not an Indian asked to be spared. There is some discrepancy in the accounts of those engaged, but the Indian killed were 186 warriors who were counted, and 18 Indian women. A number were never counted. Some escaped, and fled toward Oakfushee. Gen. Coffee’s losses were five killed and 41 wounded. Eighty-four women and children, and fourteen hopelessly crippled warriors were taken prisoners. The prisoners were sent to Huntsville.”

    2. Stephen Glover Rowe

      Hey Donna, thanks so much for your response and explanation. Interesting that DAR put the marker up in 1913 and just eight years later, Mr. Owen wrote his article. I guess sometimes one of the most difficult tasks in historical research is determining the exact location of these “smaller” battles, from a time when maps were crude and distinguishing landmarks were few and the account was usually written weeks, or months (or years?) after the occurrence. Sad the we probably can’t determine exactly from where Mr. Owen got his research. Guess this will have to relinquished to one of “history’s mysteries”.

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