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George Witty was the first child born in Limestone County, Alabama

RELATING TO THE EARLY HISTORY OF LIMESTONE COUNTY

By Thomas Smith Malone

Excerpt Transcribed from The Athens Post, April 4, 1867

Page 2, Column 3

Part V

It is a much more difficult task to infuse an interest in these sketches than I supposed when I undertook them but as I only promised, to give some disconnected “Scraps”, I do not feel that I have failed in my promise. I close up in this number the facts I have to give for the years 1807, 1808 and 1809.


George Witty, lately deceased, a Worthy citizen, was the first child born in this county. He was born in November 1808, five miles North, one degree east of Athens. Robert Pridmore was born on Colonel John Maples plantation, seven miles North of Athens, in May 1808. Henry French son of Uncle Amos, was born Nine miles east, on June 11, 1809. Mr. Thomes Redus, a very worthy and highly respectable citizen of the county, is believed to have been born the same year, 1809.

Governor gives proclamations

To fill out this number, I propose to give a few items in relation to the State. In June 1815 an election took place in Madison county for three delegates to the Territorial Legislature of the Mississippi Territory. The County (Madison) contained at this time, more than ten thousand citizens, and gave a vote at this election of 1,570 votes. Gabriel Moore, Hugh McVay and William Winston were elected.

 Gabriel Moore (Alabama Department of Archives and History)

In 1815, December 12 President Madison issued another proclamation, forbidding encroachments on the Indian lands, embracing this section, Limestone County, and large tracts lower down, belonging to four tribes, the Choctaws, Cherokees, Chickasaws and Creeks. This new and pre-emtory proclamation had a decided tendency to retard the immigration into it, though squatters continued to come but in very much diminished numbers. The trouble given the General Government about this time by the difficulties between the whites and Indians, caused in the next year, 1816 to appoint commissioners to treat with the Indians, who succeeded in the fall of this year, October 1816, in forming a treaty by which all the land from the

The trouble given the General Government about this time by the difficulties between the whites and Indians, caused in the next year, 1816 to appoint commissioners to treat with the Indians, who succeeded in the fall of this year, October 1816, in forming a treaty by which all the land from the head-waters of the Coosa, near Rome, Ga., west to the point where Caney Creek empties into the Tennesee River, including all this section of country was ceded to the United States.

One-third population in Mississippi Territory in Tennessee Valley

At that time, the Mississippi Territory included between seventy-five and eighty thousand inhabitants, nearly one-third of which was in the Tennessee Valley. From December 1816, citizens flooded to this country; Virginia, furnishing much the largest proportion; that is she was largely ahead of any other State.

On the 1st of March, 1817, Congress ordered the Territory to be divided, by a line, commencing at the mouth of Bear Creek, on the Tennessee, thence to the Northwest corner of Washington county, thence South, along the Western limit of that county, to the Sea.

Mississippi became a state

On the 10th December 1817, Mississippi was admitted as a State into the Federal union. The Territory East of the Mississippi, Congress erected into a Territory, and called it Alabama, from its great central river. At this time, August 1817, the Alabama Territory had only seven counties, Viz: Mobile, Baldwin, Washington, Clark, Madison, Limestone and Lauderdale. These counties retained their Legislative Judicial powers and officers. The seat of the Territorial Government was fixed at St. Stephens. Respectfully, M.S.T. March 30, 1867.

The state of Mississippi and Alabama territory map ca. 1817 (Library of Congress)

At this time, August 1817, the Alabama Territory had only seven counties, Viz: Mobile, Baldwin, Washington, Clark, Madison, Limestone and Lauderdale. These counties retained their Legislative Judicial powers and officers. The seat of the Territorial Government was fixed at St. Stephens. Respectfully, M.S.T. March 30, 1867.

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Statehood: Lost & Forgotten Stories lost & forgotten stories include:

  • Who Controlled And Organized The New State of Alabama?
  • Tuscaloosa Had Three Other Names
  • Chandelier Falls & Capitol Burns
  • Alabama Throws Parties For General LaFayette
  • Francis Scott Key Was Sent to Alabama To Solve Problems

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Statehood: Lost & Forgotten Stories (Volume 6)


Features: Alabama Footprints Statehood Lost Forgotten Stories
By (author): Donna R Causey
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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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2 comments

  1. Dean Cress

    I think the native Americans likely bore children before that.

  2. If he was born on a plantation, I am almost sure he wasn’t the first child born in Limestone County. But, even more to the point, I agree with Dean Cress’ comment. I am positive there were Native American children born in Limestone County before George Witty. There may be little argument about accuracy if you preface your comment with, the first white child born in Limestone County.

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