News - from the past & the present

TBT: Throwback Thursday – [old pics] Laws against 21 year-old males overworking, shooting guns at night, loud goats

News from around Alabama from the May 28, 1874 Birmingham Iron Age

  • Whooping cough is prevailing in Gadsden.

Gadsden, Alabama

Etowah county, Alabama map

  • The Gadsden Times of the 20th says: “If the firing of pistols or guns, in the streets at night, doesn’t call for a night police, what does it call for?” It calls for an efficient police force like Birmingham’s We have no rowdyism here night or day.
  • The next Legislature of Alabama should, for humanity’s sake, pass a law to prevent young gentlemen of this State, under twenty-one years of age, from hurting themselves by overwork. (Tuscaloosa Blade)
  • Bingham, of the State Journal, received a “mauling” a few days ago, and about the same time McAfee, of the Selma Republican, was also “mauled.” Both deserved it.
  • The Selma, Rome & Dalton R. R. case has been taken up to the Supreme Court under a bond of $100, 000. The sale, therefore, will not take place.
  • There is now but one place in Livingston where intoxicating liquors are sold—either at wholesale or retail. All effected without the aid of “crusaders.”

St. James Episcopal Church, Livingston, Sumter County, Alabama ca. 1930 (Library of Congress)

 

St. James Episcopal Church, Livingston, Alabama

  • A Lowndes county negro made, last year, 80 gallons of syrup and 1800 stalks of sugar cane, from half an acre of ground.
  • Col. W. B. H. Howard of Camden, will deliver the annual Address to the Literary Societies of the University of Alabama, and Rev. W. J. Lowery, of Selma, will preach the Commencement sermon.
  • The Evergreen Star says a store in that place was broken open a few nights ago, but the burglars found the goods marked so high they could not afford to take them.
  • Dr. James Berney, of Butler county, has gone to France to take charge of an inheritance recently left him.
  • The Rock Mills Manufacturing company, in Randolph county, has in operation 30,000 spindles and 42 looms.
  • The only negro summoned on the Tuscaloosa grand jury, claimed and exemption as a preacher.
  • The breaks on the Alabama Central Railroad have all been repaired, and trains now run from Selma to Meridian, making all connections.
  • The Montgomery Fair Association has been declared bankrupt, and the 28th day of this month set apart for the choice of an assignee.

Copy photograph of Court Square in downtown Montgomery, Alabama, looking south down South Court in 1874 (Alabama Department of Archives and History)Copy photograph of Court Square in downtown Montgomery, Alabama, looking south down South Court

  • On thirty-six farms in Perryville Beat, Perry county, the acreage in cotton this year is 393 acres less than it was last year. There are 990 acres more planted in Corn, Oats, Sweet Potatoes, Rye and Wheat, than there were last year.
  • The Mobile Register says that Joseph Hodgson is on the editorial staff of that paper.
  • Joel E. Matthews, one of the oldest citizens of Dallas Co., Ala., died at his residence in Selma a few days ago.
  • Capt. Wm. F. Witcher, an ex-Confederate, and lawyer in Montgomery, died recently, aged 42 years.
  • Pat Billingsley, negro, has received his commission as Post Master at Marion. He gave the necessary ten-thousand-dollar bond, signed by J. T. Harris and M. T. Hendrix. Mr. Wm. Funk will discharge the duties of the office—at least for the present.
  • The Dadeville Headlight reports that the late rains and cold weather about settled the hash with all the cotton that had been planted, and the consequence is that there is not seed enough in the country to replant all that had been planted. The Tallapoosians, however, will make it up in corn, oats and wheat.
  • Captain Leslie Johnson, the proprietor of Johnson’s wood yard on the Alabama river, long and favorably known to steamboatmen and traveling on that stream, died and was buried on his plantation on Sunday last.
  • Marriageable young ladies will take notice, that Ashville, St. Clair county is a fine field, as is shown, by census statistics, that there are five young men to one young lady in that locality.
  • Denver’s Spring, on Blount Mountain, a few miles from Ashville, is now open to visitors.
  • Ish. S. Harwell, uncle of our lamented friend, R. H. Henley, Esq. has been re-elected Mayor of the city of Demopolis.
  • Billy Again – What are our city authorities going to do about the goats—the intolerable nuisances. They rend the air at night, with their fiendish cries, and disturb the slumbers of our “Little innocents.” Can’t our Councilmen colonize them on Village creek or somewhere else? it the pests can’t be removed from the city give us one night with our shot gun. We think we can scare them out of town. What has become of the Goat ordinance, Mr. Marshal?

Goats by Carolyn Highsmith 2010 (Library of Congress)goats by Carolyn Highsmith 2010

  • Clara, infant daughter of John and Alice Giovanni, died in this city on Monday 25th last. – “Of such is the Kingdom of Heaven.”
  • Mrs. Ellen Tarrant, wife of Capt. Sam’l A. Tarrant, died in Jonesboro, Jefferson county, on Monday 25th Inst.
  • Our esteemed friend, Dr. Luckie, is truly unfortunate among horses. Not long since he was painfully injured in the right foot by his horse falling upon and crushing it. On Saturday last he was kicked on the left leg, above the ankle, by a scalawag horse, breaking some of the small bones. We hope to see him again soon on our streets—all right.

See all books by Donna R Causey

Bestselling novel RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love Book 1) is the story of a first family in colonial America who eventually migrated to Alabama. –

RIBBON OF LOVE: 2nd edition – A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love Book 1): Book 1 in Tapestry of Love Series


By (author): Donna R Causey
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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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9 comments

  1. Allan Ballard

    “The Evergreen Star says a store in that place was broken open a few nights ago, but the burglars found the goods marked so high they could not afford to take them.”

  2. Karen Mellema

    That is too funny about the store in being broke into. what a laugh.

  3. Diane Young Henderson

    Guess they didn’t really want to steal after all.;)

  4. James L. Patterson

    This is some good reading..

  5. Linda Stone Holmes

    I love this page. Can’t get enough.

  6. Love this site

  7. […] We are told that the City Council have resolved to get rid of the goats in our city. They will send to Africa and import a boa constrictor – starve him a few weeks (easily done in the present condition of the City Treasury), and then turn Mr. Boa loose among the goats. Good-bye, Billy. (see more about the goat story at this link: Throwback Thursday […]

  8. “Marriageable young ladies will take notice, that Ashville, St. Clair county is a fine field, as is shown, by census statistics, that there are five young men to one young lady in that locality.”

    A saying among women in Alaska is –
    “Men outnumber women, so the odds are good, but the goods are odd.”

  9. […] We are told that the City Council have resolved to get rid of the goats in our city. They will send to Africa and import a boa constrictor – starve him a few weeks (easily done in the present condition of the City Treasury), and then turn Mr. Boa loose among the goats. Good-bye, Billy. (see more about the goat story at this link: Throwback Thursday […]

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