Days Gone By - stories from the past

Here is the way young women attending college dressed around 1900 when they went on an outing

The photographs below were made between 1890- 1910 and are probably of young women attending the Alabama Girls’ Industrial School in Montevallo, Alabama which is currently the University of Montevallo in Shelby County, Alabama. The Alabama Girls’ Industrial School opened its doors to around 150 young women throughout the state.


The school was a new experiment in education for your girls who wanted to become “teachers, bookkeepers artists, musicians, dressmakers, telegraphers and milliners. In other words, at last, there was a school in Alabama whose purpose was to educate women to be self-supporting.”i

In 1911 the name was changed to Alabama Girls; Technical Institute. A few more name changes occurred, but the college remained strictly for women until January 1956 when two men enrolled. More men followed and in 1969, the final name change, the University of Montevallo was made which reflected the changing atmosphere.

Many of the photographs were taken at Davis Falls in Aldrich near Montevallo, Alabama.

Young women on the bank of a spring near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Caleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8925Young women on the bank of a spring near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8925

 

Young women holding snowballs at a footbridge in Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Caleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8923Young women holding snowballs at a footbridge in Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8923

Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8927Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8927

Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8926Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama photographed by R. W. Carleton, Montevallo, Alabama Q8926

Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama. Q40185Young women at Davis Falls near Montevallo, Alabama. Q40185

Young woman, probably a student at the Alabama Girls' Industrial School in Montevallo, Alabama, seated on the front porch of the E. S. Lyman home Q40190

Young woman, probably a student at the Alabama Girls’ Industrial School in Montevallo, Alabama, seated on the front porch of the E. S. Lyman home Q40190

SOURCES

  1. Alabama Department of Archives and History
  2. University of Montevallo

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) – A novel inspired by the experiences of the Cottingham family who immigrated from the Eastern Shore of Virginia to Alabama

Discordance:: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)


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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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20 comments

  1. Charlotte Marlow McEwen

    Fashions were slow to change. Class of 73.

    1. Becky Paradise

      Class of 1972, we could only wear slacks from Friday evenings to Saturday evening in.1968. Dresses for classes!

  2. Marty Gibson

    I attended there in 74.

    1. Becky Paradise

      I graduated in 1972 (Becky Coffee)

  3. Becky Mcclenny

    I had an Alabama History class in the fifth grade,I believe ’75-76,the greatest teacher,Mrs. Majorie Fendley.Since,I can’t consume enough Alabama History! This was on Wilcox County at Wilcox Academy. I am proud to say that I’m a member of the Wilcox Academy Alumni Association.

  4. Trisha Linley

    My mom was the last group to be all girls school

  5. Judie Crowther

    Our daughter received her undergraduate and Masters degree here, before she went on to get her culinary degree from NECI. So proud of her and her decision-making. Love you Melissa Close-Hart!

  6. Bailey Witt

    Jessica Lauren Zambie

  7. Sue McCalpin Cross

    Love these pictures , a better time in our history in my opinion .

  8. Jim Alston

    My grandmother Elizabeth Pitman May was a student at Montevallo about that time….my mother was there in the mid 30’s….her name was Ruth May Alston…four of my aunt’s also graduated in the 30s and 40s….

  9. Byron Abrams

    My Grandmother attended in the early 1900’s, and then taught school until she was 71 yrs old! Wonderful

  10. Victoria Lewis

    Love these pictures! My grandmother graduated in the early 30’s.

  11. Donna — pictures show more scenery than details of how the women dress. If dresses were theme, then zoom in so readers can see details. Someone mentioned that Montvallo began accepting male students in 1956. A former World War II Army buddy enrolled there in 1947 under GI Bill because it was closed to his home.

  12. Mary Hall

    My mother, Elizabeth Martin graduated from Montevallo and was one of the 7 “Martin girls” from Enterprise who attended there in the late 20s and 1930s.

  13. Connie Conner

    in 1968, it was called Alabama College, I was accepted and scheduled to attend classes that fall, but I moved to North Carolina that summer and didn’t make it back….I fell in love with the campus, the spreading oak trees, the ivy growing on the buildings, the cobblestone roads …I wonder if it’s still the same

    1. Alabama Pioneers

      Yes, it is still a beautiful campus.

  14. It hasn’t changed much, Connie. I graduated from there in 1988 (Renae Guy Carpenter) and my son is a student there now (Devin Harrison). I LOVE that place!!

  15. Emily B. Cooper

    My grandmother went to Montevallo during that time period. She married in 1907, so probably 1906…. He wedding dress was exactly like some of the dresses in the picture. Later, I will try to find the picture so I can post it along with this.

  16. Brenda Alexander Rogers

    I attended here in ’69. Beautiful campus. Lived in Main dormitory. Great year of school before later receiving my undergraduate degree and Masters degree at UAB.

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