Days Gone By - stories from the past

How much have cheerleader costumes changed since the 1950s?

It is amazing what can be found at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Here are some Baldwin Junior High cheerleader pictures from Montgomery, Alabama that made their way to the Alabama Department of Archives and History.  Do you recognize anyone? The last picture has the names of the girls.


Cheerleadeaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama January 12, 1960 Q72144Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama January 12, 1960 Q72144 (by photographer John E. Scott, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama November 6, 1959 Q72142Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama November 6, 1959 Q72142 (by photographer John E. Scott, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama. March 1957 Q72135Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama. March 1957 Q72135 (by photographer John E. Scott, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama. April 16, 1958, Q72137Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama April 16, 1958 Q72137 (by photographer John E. Scott, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama Nov. 20, 1958 Q72140 (John E. Scott, ADAH)Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama November 20, 1958 Q72140 (by photographer John E. Scott, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama Q72134 January 10, 1956 (John E. Scott, ADAH)Cheerleaders at Baldwin Junior High School in Montgomery, Alabama Q72134 January 10, 1956 Front row, left to right: Vannah Watts, Cynthia Judkins, Judy Cook (holding the megaphone), and Marianne O’Daniel. Middle row, left to Right: Ann Darden, Anne Alford, Charlotte Baker and Patty Ansley, Back row, left to right: Johnyee Perrette, Carol Johnson, Shelby Mitchell, and Diane Whitehurst (by photographer John E. Scott, Montgomery, Alabama, Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) Inspired by true events and the Cottingham family (a pioneer Alabama family) resided in 17th century Somerset, Maryland and Delaware, colonial America comes alive with pirate attacks, religious discord, and governmental disagreements in the pre-Revolutionary War days of America. 

Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) (Paperback)


By (author):  Donna R Causey
List Price:$9.77 USD
New From:$9.77 USD In Stock
buy now

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

Liked it? Take a second to support Alabama Pioneers on Patreon!

8 comments

  1. AuntWendy Craft

    Sherri Rhodes, fun old days!

  2. Yvita Luckie

    A lot and NOT for the better!

  3. Kearney Hall

    My wife Barbara dressed just the same from 1957-61 in Birmingham’s West End HS!

  4. Melissa Thomas Lankford

    I remember my aunt’s cheerleader skirt from the 1950s, it was corduroy lined in satin, and very heavy!

  5. Lynn Evans Sullivan

    Lol, for one thing we don’t call them costumes any more. Or at least they didn’t in 1973. My cheerleader costume was called a uniform.

  6. Nina Ann Johns Nalley

    In the 60’s, our Cheerleader and Majorette uniforms we’re modest. Today, the uniforms look like stripper outfits. Too many boobs and hineys showing, too many sexual explicit moved in the routines.

  7. Denise Upton Marcus

    The skirts look to short for 50’s. The hairstyles caught my attention too!

  8. Pat Ross Ballard

    And no obesity in the group, what has changed in the last 4 decades? Fast food , drive through s , no physical exercise and etc.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.