Days Gone By - stories from the past

Vintage photographs ca. 1900s from Ensley, Alabama found

While doing research for stories, I frequently run across many photographs of people, (identified and unidentified) like the ones below which may be of interest to descendants and researchers and post them on the website with any information recorded and links to the source.


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Boys' basketball team at Ensley High School in Ensley, Alabama 1910 Q5516Boys’ basketball team at Ensley High School in Ensley, Alabama 1910 Q5516

Here workmen at the Ensley Rail Mill straighten a steel rail, which presently will become a portion of track for some southern railroad. ca. 1949 photographer Roy T. Carter, Sr. Birmingham News-Age-Herald Q46227 “Straightening the paths for the Iron Horse” at the Tennessee Coal, Iron, and Railroad Company in Ensley, Alabama. Here workmen at the Ensley Rail Mill straighten a steel rail, which presently will become a portion of track for some southern railroad. ca. 1949 photographer Roy T. Carter, Sr. Birmingham News-Age-Herald Q46227

Children and adults in the back of a wagon, ready for the Annual Kindergarten Picnic in Ensley ca. 1900-1910 – . Q5517Children and adults in the back of a wagon, ready for the “Annual Kindergarten Picnic” in Ensley ca. 1900-1910 – The Wagon is decorated with American flags. Q5517

Young African American boy, possibly Tillie Brooks of Ensley, Alabama. ca. 1910 The photograph was taken in Bessemer. Q49338Young African American boy, possibly Tillie Brooks of Ensley, Alabama. ca. 1910 The photograph was taken in Bessemer. Tintype is 2.24 x 3.25 inches and is enclosed in cardboard sleeve. Q49338

Discordance: The Cottinghams – a novel of Colonial America (Volume 1)

 

 

Louisa Thomas of Uniontown, Alabama ca. 1900 photographer Russell Brothers, Ensley, Alabama Q49370Louisa Thomas of Uniontown, Alabama ca. 1900 photographer Russell Brothers, Ensley, Alabama Q49370

SEE ALL BOOKS BY DONNA R.  CAUSEY

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Confrontation:: Lost & Forgotten Stories

Prior to statehood, Alabama was a vast wilderness with a large Native American population. It is only natural that when new immigrants from other states arrived, conflicts over the land would arise. Soon, these small conflicts exploded into war.

Alabama Footprints Confrontation is a collection of lost and forgotten stories that reveals why and how the confrontation between the Native American population and settlers developed into the Creek-Indian War as well as stories of the bravery and heroism of participants from both sides.
Some stores include:

  • Tecumseh Causes Earthquake
  • Terrified Settlers Abandon Farms
  • Survivor Stories From Fort Mims Massacre
  • Hillabee Massacre
  • Threat of Starvation Men Turn To Mutiny
  • Red Eagle After The War

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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6 comments

  1. I enjoy every thing you put on the internet. My family is from Alabama. Wish my dad could have lived to see some of the pictures etc. you have .

    1. I’m glad you enjoy the stories. Thank you for taking the time to comment. Donna

  2. Thank you so very much for sharing these Ensley, AL photos! My brick wall is my great grandfather whose last known whereabouts was in Ensley.

  3. Craig Porter

    That’s me, the scrawny fellow on the back row. I was only 14 in 1900!

  4. Yvita Luckie

    Do you have any pictures from Awin or Pineapple, AL/Moore Academy (1944-46)? I would love to see my mother is any of them. Thank you.

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