Days Gone By - stories from the past

Living conditions were difficult in early steel days – this film & vintage photographs tell the tale

[These photographs of Birmingham, Alabama were taken in 1936.]

Birmingham is the largest city in Alabama. Most of the original settlers were of English Ancestry, hence the name Birmingham after Birmingham in the United Kingdom.

The Magic City

The fast pace of Birmingham’s growth during 1881 from 1920 earned it the nickname of the Magic City and for the booming steel industry taking place in the city, it was also sometimes called the Pittsburgh of the South.

Towns owned by the steel company grew up almost overnight. These photographs were taken in March 1936 of the steel industry in Alabama. All pictures were taken by Walter Evans.

Town owned by the Steel Company - notice the line of outhouses behind the houses.

This was a steel company owned town in Birmingham in 1936.  Look at all the outhouses lined up in a row.  At least there was electricity.

Middle Class neighborhood in Birmingham March 1936

This was considered to be a middle class neighborhood in Birmingham in 1936.  I wish it was identified further.

Birmingham Boardinghouse March 1936

This was a boarding house in Birmingham in 1936.

Birmingham Steel workers houses owned by Republic Steel March 1936

Another photograph of company owned houses in 1936 — they were owned by Republic Steel.

Steel Mill and Workers Houses

Steel Mill with company owned workers’ houses lined up down the road from the plant.

Birminham Industrial workers with their children March 1936

Birmingham workers with their families in 1936. No television to stay home and watch so I guess people just visited. Look at the smoke bulging out of the pipes. That wouldn’t happen today.

Birmingham steel workers on street in 1936

 See best-selling books by Donna R Causey

ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS Exploration: Lost & Forgotten Stories (Volume 1)

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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