3 comments

  1. Dave Patterson

    My GGG Grandfather Leroy Day was a Drummer boy at the Battle of New Orleans. When he started a family he moved to Ft. Deposit.

  2. Anthony Bryan Taylor

    Fort bowyer British troops moved in from little lagoon leaving a small garrison at a small village 4 miles east of the fort

  3. Unfortunately much needs to be corrected, as been discussed in the annual symposium for the Battle of New Orleans at Nunez College in St. Bernards Parish near the battlefield near New Orleans.
    The war did not end with the signing of the treaty on Dec. 24th, 1814. The treaty still needed to be ratified by both countries and exchanged by the ambassadors for it to be official, which did not finally happen until the following March.
    The British command at New Orleans knew the negotiation was going on in Ghent, but their orders were to continue anyway until they heard otherwise. If the British has succeeded and captured the city, and then received word to stop, they might have ignored the treaty and the US could not have done anything about it.
    There was another land battle at St. Mary’s, Georgia on Feb. 24th, 1815, when the British raided that town. That was after Mobile Bay.
    And Florida was never actually purchased from Spain in the Adam-Onis Treaty. As far as anyone can find out, no money was exchanged for the transaction. It was a cancellation of war debts between the two countries. And those who filed for losses also happened to be those who supported the US in the Patriot War in East Florida. We also promised to leave Texas alone in that treaty, but that didn’t last very long.
    See, the War of 1812 is very complicated.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.