Days Gone By - stories from the past

An oak tree in Eufaula, Alabama officially owns itself – here is why

Eufaula is blessed with many old trees

The city of Eufaula, Alabama is blessed with many beautiful historic houses, and it also has many old trees to compliment the picturesque scene.


Once, a huge oak grew squarely near the center of the city at 512 Cotton Avenue and had the distinct privilege of owning itself.  It was a favorite place for local children to play and was a landmark for the city so a local historian persuaded the city council to deed the tree to itself and through these acts it happened. It was given its freedom by the governor in 1936.tree that owns itself 1936

Deed recorded

The city, through its mayor, recorded a deed in 1935 which reads in part: “I. E. H. Graves, as Mayor of the City of Eufaula, do hereby grant, bargain, sell and convey unto the ‘Post Oak Tree,” not as an individual, partnership nor corporation, but as a creation and gift of the Almighty, standing in our midst—to itself—to have and to hold itself, its branches, limbs, trunk and roots so long as it shall live.” The tree is also known as the Walker Oak.

The tree was quite old when it was deeded

The tree was quite old at the time and an iron fence donated by Dr. J. J. Houston to surround it, was equally old.

It is very likely, Creek Indians met under the trees cool summer branches. It also served as an outpost of sorts for early settlers who passed by it as they traveled north over the wooden bridge that crossed Chewalla Creek.son of the tree that owned itself son

Confederate soldier owned the land

Confederate soldier Captain John A. Walker later owned the land and his children played under the magnificent tree. When Captain Walker’s house burned, the tree survived and continued to withstand many storms until April 1961, when destructive winds swept through Eufaula and destroyed it.tree plaque

Tree was replaced

At the time, the tree was estimated to be greater than 200 years old. Since the tree owned the land,  it was replaced by another only to die again and be replaced. The tree that stands there now is not the original tree, but, it still retains its own deed to the property.

Tapestry of Love is  a historical fiction series about an Alabama family who originally settled on the Eastern Shore of Virginia in 1638 and migrated to Alabama in the early 1800’s – 

Faith and Courage: A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love) (Volume 2)

In this action packed novel depicting true events, the family saga continues with Ambrose Dixon’s family. George Willson witnesses the execution of King Charles II and is forced to leave the woman he loves to witch hunters in 17th century England as he flees to his sister, Mary, and her husband Ambrose Dixon’s home in Colonial American. Ridden with guilt over difficult decisions he made to survive, George Willson and the Dixon’s embrace the Quaker faith which further creates problems for their existence in the New World.

 

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Faith and Courage: A Novel of Colonial America (Tapestry of Love) (Volume 2)


Features: Faith and Courage A Novel of Colonial America
By (author): Donna R Causey
List Price: $13.87 USD
New From: $13.47 USD In Stock

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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me
All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.
She has authored numerous genealogy books.
RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE)
is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2)
is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series)
Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1)
is the continuation of the story. .
For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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12 comments

  1. Cheryl McNeer Rogers

    Debbie Farmer, isn’t this your hometown?

  2. Debbie Farmer

    Actually it’s where Danny and I met. His family had lived there for many yrs. We were high school sweethearts. My dad was a methodist minister so we never lived anywhere very long but was blessed to live n Eufaula long enough to meet Danny.

  3. Why was word “Post” removed from plaque?

    1. The original tree was destroyed by a storm. Perhaps something changed when this tree was replanted.

  4. Ed Whatley

    Ok. What word was removed in the last “Oak Tree” reference? Lettering is out of balance.

  5. Richard McVay

    Looks like “Post.”

  6. A post oak is a type, like white oak, or red oak or live oak. I believe the original tree was a post oak, but the others were not, so they changed the plaque.

  7. Debbie Johnston

    Bambi Childers Holmes

  8. Carol Baker

    Brenda Thomas Ramey

    1. Brenda Thomas Ramey

      Remember this tree well. Also remember the day it fell.

  9. Peggy Carter

    I remember this tree. It was given its freedom the same year I was born! Saw it many times!

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