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Biography: Captain Leander J. Bryan, Jr. born February 4, 1843 – photograph

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bryan, leander j. - 1843 - AutuagaCAPTAIN LEANDER J. BRYAN. JR

BIOGRAPHY and GENEALOGY

(b. 1843 Autauga Co., AL d. 1907)

Autauga, Elmore and Montgomery County, Alabama

Captain Leander J. Bryan, Jr., of Montgomery, Alabama, was born in Autauga county, Alabama on Feb. 4, 1843, and was raised on a farm. He attended only the common schools until he was sixteen years old when his father, Leander J. Bryan, Sr., of  Wetumpka, Alabama, entered him as a student in the Coosa River institute.


There he remained until 1861. When less than eighteen years old he left school and enlisted as a private in the ranks of Wetumpka Light Guards, Third Alabama regiment volunteer infantry, C. S. A., of Col. Tennet Lomax This was the first Alabama regiment sent to join the Confederate army in Virginia.

Young Bryan served with it throughout the entire Civil war. He was furloughed home but once during that time in 1865 by special order of Gen. Lee for gallant conduct on the field of battle, for “meritorious service” as a soldier and on account of wounds. He returned in time to participate in the final struggle at Petersburg and until the surrender at Appomattox where he escaped and made his way back to Alabama.

After the War, he engaged in the hotel business until 1867, when he accepted the position of book-keeper under United States Marshal John Hardy He subsequently served as a deputy under United States Marshal Gen. John W. Henley. Bryan moved to Lowndes county in the winter of 1868 and served first as clerk for the circuit court, and one term sheriff and general administrator of the county. He was engaged for twelve years in the public service.

Captain Bryan was one of the first ex-Confederate soldiers to affiliate after the war with the Republican party and in 1868 he “stumped” his Congressional district for Gen. U. S. Grant for President of the United States. He was a Grant man again in 1872, and mainly through his efforts, the county of Lowndes gave Grant a large majority.

In 1869 he was appointed chief deputy to United States Marshal George Turner who was ex-United States Senator from the State of Washington. Lewis Parsons, distributer of Federal patronage under Harrison, blocked him from assuming the duties of United States marshal. He took his defeat quietly and accepted the place of chief deputy in the office of Dr. R. A. Moseley, collector of revenue for the State. He was elected a delegate to three national conventions of his party, and ‘was president of the Republican State convention in 1898. Bryan was appointed marshal of the middle district of Alabama by President McKinley in his first administration and was reappointed to the same office by Predsident Roosevelt in December 1901.

Leander J. “Lee” Bryan passed away May 10, 1907, and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Montgomery, Alabama.

 

SOURCES

  1. History of Alabama and dictionary of Alabama biography, Volume 3 By Thomas McAdory Owen, Marie Bankhead Owen
  2. Notable men of Alabama edited by Joel Campbell DuBose Vol. III
  3. Find a grave.com Memorial# 61200870

This biography can be found in Biographies of Notable and Not-so-Notable Alabama Pioneers Volume V

Biographies of Notable & Not-so-Notable : Alabama Pioneers  Volume V (Biographies of Notable and Not-so-Notable Alabama Pioneers Book 5) (Kindle Edition)


By (author):  Donna R. Causey
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About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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2 comments

  1. In view of his Confederate military service, I guess we can forgive his later collaboration with the occupying military government and its corrupt, Scalawag Republican party which maintained Mr. Bryan in politically-appointed offices until they were finally voted out in Alabama. Mr. Bryan filled the office of Sheriff in Lowndes County, not by legal election, but as an agent of the reconstruction. He replaced my great grandfather, Andrew Martin Black, who had simultaneously served in the Confederate Home Guard and as the legally-elected Lowndes County Sheriff who was removed by the Federals. Just History.

  2. No votes for turncoats. Well said Mr. Duncan Black.

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