15 comments

  1. Anna Blake

    I was born in Cherokee County, in Centre.

  2. […] Chiaha, on the Coosa River, in the northeastern section of Alabama, it is noted that pots of honey were […]

  3. Elisa Sanford

    my mom’s line spell the name CARDEN.

  4. Thomas Warren

    There is an Indian mound under Weiss lake in Cherokee county. You can see the top of it when the water is down in winter

  5. Thomas Warren

    There is an Indian mound under Weiss lake in Cherokee county. You can see the top of it when the water is down in winter

  6. Pamela Self Reynolds

    I liked this story. My great grandfathers mother was a Creek Indian. However I am curious about the photo of this tree. Can someone tell me about it? Where is it located?

  7. Ned D Boggan

    Pamela Self Reynolds the tree looks shaped by nature or native Americans most likely by human by this example

  8. Ed Pitts

    I don’t know about these trees but there have been many created by young lovers. The man would bend a small tree over to create a seat for the lady. Repeated use of this tree caused it to be deformed. They were called “spooning trees”.
    Or that’s what my grandma told me.

  9. Johnny Scales

    Native Americans bent trees in this and other fashions to mark trail and other things.

  10. Alabama Pioneers

    Some people believe that trees were twisted by the Native Americans forced to Travel on the Trail of Tears – see this story for more info. http://alabamapioneers.com/trees-along-trail-tears-twisted-strange-shapes/#sthash.BT8CCVNI.dpbs

  11. Muchos Gracias for your blog article.Really thank you! Much obliged.

  12. Deborah Locke

    See Joel Dickey & Zack Abaunza the creeks & the Cherokee came from Alabama… Zack you are both…

  13. Nana Chiaha is near Maubila by way of the old Big Trading Road aka the Old Natchez Trace.

    Everybody already knows this…

  14. Another major issue is that the stories about DeSoto don’t materialize until at least 25 years after the adventure according to the Gentleman from Elvas and the others as late as maybe the 1850’s convenient to becoming Alabama History.

    Prior to this we owe a lot to Washington Irving – quite the author.

    Of course, he had some friends who were worthy authors.

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