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35 comments

  1. Seems your sources should also include Pickett’s book. Several of the quotes are taken directly from his work.

    1. Thank you for your comment. We are truly thankful for Albert J. Pickett and his work. The reason Pickett’s name was not included is because this is a direct transcribed excerpt from Rev. Brewer’s article. I’m sure Rev. Brewer included Albert J. Pickett in his book, as most historians of this time did. Often, these early Alabama historians consulted with each other and quoted each other exactly in their books without clearly delineating their source. I am unable to discern which historian had the information first (Brewer or Pickett) so I simply provided the most direct source, Rev. Brewer and left it up to the reader to make this distinction by reader Rev. Brewer’s book. Sometimes, I imagine many people gave them the same account of an event and so no clear ‘first’ source can be determined. At the beginning of Albert J. Pickett’s book we find the following note. Note by A. J. Pickett. I have taken
      many of the following notes down on paper in a great hurry, as fast
      as the people narrating would speak, and there are many mistakes in
      grammar, spelling & general arrangement. I wrote often under many
      disadvantages – frequently surrounded by intrusive people asking
      idle questions, often writing in fields in swamps, on my knees,
      wherever I had an opportunity of meeting with the person I desired to
      obtain the information from – I have traveled much over South
      Alabama to complete my stock of Historical information & was
      about twelve months engaged at it. I have seen many curious people,
      been in many curious houses, took all kinds of fare & lodging
      most cheerfully & was always enthusiastic & well satisfied if
      I obtained information. As the reader of these notes will see I
      have left no stone uuturned to get all the information necessary or
      that was extant. Many of the following notes have been kindly
      furnished by persons themselves, through the mails and will be found
      to be in their own hand & language. Montgomery 8 . Dec http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm/singleitem/collection/voices/id/3092/rec/1

    2. Thank you for your comment. We are truly thankful for Albert J. Pickett and his work. The reason Pickett’s name was not included as a source is because this is a direct transcribed excerpt from Rev. Brewer’s article. I’m sure Rev. Brewer included Albert J. Pickett in his book as a source, like most historians of this time did. Often, the early Alabama historians consulted with each other and quoted each other exactly in their books without clearly delineating their source.

      I was unable to discern which historian had the information first (Brewer or Pickett) so I simply provided the most direct source, Rev. Brewer and left it up to the reader to make this distinction by reading Rev. Brewer’s book. I imagine many people gave these historians the same account of an event and so no clear ‘first’ source can be determined.

      At the beginning of Albert J. Pickett’s book we find the following interesting note on the way he acquired information. Note by A. J. Pickett. I have taken
      many of the following notes down on paper in a great hurry, as fast as the people narrating would speak, and there are many mistakes in
      grammar, spelling & general arrangement. I wrote often under many disadvantages – frequently surrounded by intrusive people asking idle questions, often writing in fields in swamps, on my knees, wherever I had an opportunity of meeting with the person I desired to obtain the information from – I have traveled much over South Alabama to complete my stock of Historical information & was about twelve months engaged at it. I have seen many curious people, been in many curious houses, took all kinds of fare & lodging most cheerfully & was always enthusiastic & well satisfied if I obtained information. As the reader of these notes will see I have left no stone unturned to get all the information necessary or that was extant. Many of the following notes have been kindly furnished by persons themselves, through the mails and will be found to be in their own hand & language. Montgomery 8 . Dec http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/…/voices/id/3092/rec/1

  2. Good book, historical fiction,
    “ALEXANDER McGILLIVRAY, EMPEROR OF THE CREEKS”

  3. Being a Scottish descendant, I take issue with the word “Scotch” to indicate a person from Scotland. ‘Scotch’ is a drink; ‘Scot’ is the man. Actually my ancestors were Scots-Irish from Antrim, Northern Ireland.

    1. This is a transcribed excerpt from Rev. Brewer’s original work and includes misspellings. I tried to point them out with (sic) whenever possible, but sometimes I missed them. Thank you for catching this one.

    2. Thank you for catching the misspelling. This article is an exact transcription of an excerpt from Rev. Brewer’s book and when transcribing, I never change the original spelling, but try to denote it by (sic). In old works, misspelled words or often found. I missed this one and did not denote the misspelled word. Donna

    1. Albert J. Pickett is considered by many to be Alabama’s 1st historian. The majority of history curriculum in Alabama school’s is based on his work. However, there were a number of Alabama historians from different localities and I am attempting to inform readers of the lesser known historians by providing interesting excerpts from them on the Alabama pioneers website. His book, HISTORY of ALABAMA AND INCIDENTALLY OF GEORGIA AND MISSISSIPPI, FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD – can be found in most libraries. Here is a brief biography about him on the website. http://alabamapioneers.com/biography-col-albert-j-pickett-born-1810-with-photograph/#sthash.xkUutzA3.dpbs

    2. Thank you for your comment. Albert J. Pickett is considered by many to be Alabama’s 1st historian. The majority of history curriculum in Alabama school’s is based on his work. However, there were a number of Alabama historians from different localities and I am attempting to inform readers of the lesser known historians by providing interesting excerpts from them on the Alabama pioneers website. His book, HISTORY of ALABAMA AND INCIDENTALLY OF GEORGIA AND MISSISSIPPI, FROM THE EARLIEST PERIOD – can be found in most libraries. Here is a brief biography about him on the website. http://alabamapioneers.com/biography-col-albert-j-pickett-born-1810-with-photograph/#sthash.xkUutzA3.dpbs

  4. Please get your facts straight. There is no such thing as an Indian princess. Our culture recognizes our chieftains, warriors, shamans, and beloved women. We have no royalty, and therefore no princesses or princes. Upon a chieftains death, his son is not the new chief, but rather a new one is chosen.
    Wado – Usti Sunalei Noquisi, Aniyunwaya Tsalagi

    1. Most of this article has been transcribed from the sources indicated which was written by Alabama historians prior to 1921. Rather than change their words, I quoted directly. Many books at the time obviously made a mistake when mentioning Indian princesses. Sorry about the confusion and thank you for clarifying this fact.

  5. Unfortunately the casino was completed and an expansion is being planned.

  6. I am ashamed to be a person of this State and had no idea about this. I even taught Alabama History for a couple of years in the 90s. Thank you for this information.

  7. Why was the construction not halted until the courts settled the lawsuits? But that wouldn’t be fair either because the courts are so slow and I think purposely.

  8. can you metal detect at mc gillivray platation in wetumpa al-where is it from montgomery-directions

  9. Sandra Craft, if you haven’t already added this site, at least read a few articles. Very nicely done.

  10. My fifth great grandmother is Sehoy III, 6th great Sehoy II, and 7th Sehoy I. 🙂 I am through Sehoy III’s son John Weatherford. 🙂

    1. Sehoy I, Sehoy II, and Sophia McGillivray are my direct line. Sophia was Sehoy III’s sister. My direct line continued with through my Durant Brashears, Byrd/Smith, and Crist family.

    2. Chief Red Eagle and Sehoy III are buried in Baldwin County and it’s run by the state I think.

    3. They’re buried a few miles north of Fort Mims.

    4. Taryn Crista McCormick Tiffany Ackerman Yes, I have been there! 🙂 I used to have the pictures posted publicly on FB, but I was afraid that everyone got sick of me talking about my genealogy. lol I love reading about my 6th great aunt Sophia (Your very great grandmother) with her being pregnant with the twins and standing her ground against our enemies so fiercely. 🙂

    5. One of her twins Rachel is my other great great something grandmother too.

    6. Great! 🙂 You have a lot of ancestral strength to draw on! 🙂

    7. I wish I could enlarge the photos of both of you ladies who are descended from Sehoy and related to Weatherford. From the tiny photo I see, it looks like both of you have Indian features. You may or may not be aware, but it is highly likely you are related to the movie star and Alabama football star, Johnny Mack Brown, whose mother was a McGillevray.

  11. we are descendants of who you are all talking about,,my ancestors lived the stories but they are not stories they are true and lived it..so we are going back to the grounds of where they walked before they were told to leave, ,so have all the information for us when we get there and we will appreciate it so much, if you could have pictures or paintings that we could have.

  12. […] downtown Wetumpka was developed on both sides of the Coosa River, and Fort Toulouse was built near […]

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