13 comments

  1. A sad share croppers life indeed.

  2. Yes,it was sad but people had a chance to survive. I have an old ledger that dad used to helpout the people with that share cropped on our place. Lots of the stuff were never checked off as payed back. He never worried about it because he believed in helping them all he could. It payed off in friendship in later years.

  3. Hot and the shutters closed to keep bugs out…..(I am assuming). Miserable.

  4. Sharecropping went on well into the 60’s. Hard, hard way to live. I speak from experience.

  5. Another testimony to the effects of “reconstruction” which lasted well into the middle of the 1900’s for white and black folks in Alabama. ..once again, a failure of government programs conceived in Washington with no knowledge of their potential impact on the rural south.

  6. This is how my grandmother grew up. So glad her lifetime of hard work and good advice paved the way for us to have a better life.

  7. This house looks good compared to the ones I remember that lasted into the early 70,s in mMorgan Lawrence Limestone and Madison counties

  8. IN MANY CASES, SHARE CROPPERS WERE MERE SLAVES TO THE LAND OWNER AND THEY WERE NOT BLACK BUT WHITE . MANY A GOOD PERSON CAME FROM THE SHARE CROPPERS HOME AND SOME ROSE TO FAME. EATING CORNBREAD AND PEAS FOR SUPPER WAS LIKE A SUNDAY MEAL—–

  9. There were sharecropers in the 1950s in Carbon Hill I visited them it was sad

  10. I’m still looking for photo’s for this area for african-american families, but I guess cameras were the least thing they were lacking at that time. Hard life indeed.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.