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PATRON + Films, pictures and story of the 1920s and 1930s, and memories of Perry and Dallas County, Alabama

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26 comments

  1. My ancestors were among them and from there went to Marion County.

  2. I love these stories,just not sure what language was not appropriate.

  3. Nothing wrong with language either!

  4. Didn’t see any inappropriate language either. I thought it was rather tame considering the times.

  5. Good account of life at that time. I also did not see any offensive language. Negro and jew is not considered offensive as far as I know

  6. I had to read it twice and STILL can’t figure out why they felt compelled to put the “inappropriate language” disclaimer on the article! Geez

  7. Such a shame that the hotel Albert was torn down

  8. In the past some have confused this Perry family line with Navy Cmdr. Oliver Hazard Perry, famous for the Battle of Lake Erie in War of 1812. Far as I know there is NO relationship.

    1. It appears to me that the Perry’s, like many Americans in the first 50 years after the Revolution, named their sons after eminent Americans. This family’s Oliver Hazard Perry was born right after the War of 1812, when his presumed namesake, the Commodore, had become famous for an engagement on Lake Erie. This baby’s brother was named Benjamin F. Perry. I wonder whom the parents had in mind then?

      1. You are right Mr. McVay the Perry’s named their children after important people as that was a great honor in that day and time. My gg grandfather was named Benjamin F. Perry, brother to Oliver Hazard Perry. From as far back as I have researched as far back as the 1700s, and the Perry’s have used the same given names for each generation.

        I am so proud we have this written document for generations to learn about their Perry family, which grew to be quite large.

  9. That Perry family is my kin!!

  10. It’s sad and ridiculous. A site dedicated to putting forth the history of Alabama and they’re making preemptive PC apologies about historical Alabama documents that, as far as I can see, have no need for an apology….as if any historical document needs an apology. It’s history for Christ’s sake!

  11. I found this article years ago at the Selma Library and have shared it numerous times with genealogy researchers. Britton Perry was my ggg grandfather. I am so happy to see William Oliver Perry’s work added with the wonderful photos to the American Pioneers site.

    This Perry family was a cousin to Oliver Hazard and Matthew Perry of Rhode Island.

  12. I Like these these stories I am 54 years old and raised 5 daughters who are all grown know now. I have 14 grandkids amd have lived in Alabama all my life. But I have lived in Pine Apple Alabama for 10 years have been disabled for 4 years now. I dont like it here because I dont know alot of the community I really live in a community call Awin but there is nothing in either one population is 202, the closes town is 20 miles and that is Grenville Alabama. I would like to know more about the Butler Masacre there is a landmark about 2 miles from our house on the other side of the sing it has a story about Fort Sims I think not sure.

  13. William Oliver Perry was my Great Grandfather. My dad, John Apperson, is the youngest son of Amelia Perry Apperson. I am very proud of my family and wish I had known Grampa Perry. He is a legend in my family.

  14. Donna, I have a picture of William Oliver Perry his grandson, John D. Apperson shared with me several years ago. I will be glad to share with you for this article. E-mail me at [email protected].

    Hi Mary Frances,
    I would love to attach it to his biography. If you could scan it, and email it in .jpg format to [email protected], then I’ll add it to the biography.
    Donna

  15. I worked in the hotel Albert from the 7th grade until after I graduated. Reynolds Radio Shop was on the side of the hotel facing the street and across the street from a small restaurant. I installed the paging and sound system in the hotel. Next to us was a chiropractor, Dr. Allie B. Langley. I used to read the doctors mail to him as he was almost blind. I heard that horses were kept in the ground floor of the hotel during the war. I have fond memories of the people I met and the people I knew while at the hotel.

  16. This is the funniest thing I’ve read in a long time:

    “There was a farmer named Boggs who lived north of Summerfield and was considered very homely. One day, a Tennessee horse-drover met him in the road. After looking at him pretty hard, he said, “My friend, you are the very man I have been looking for. You are the ugliest man I ever saw and I am going to give you a mule. Just look this drove over and take your pick.” The farmer did so, taking a dark gray one. He kept it until it was snow white.”

    Lord, I love Southern humor…!

  17. I think the disclaimer leading into the article is rather insulting to the readers of this written article. They are assuming that everyone does not understand that language we use today is different than that of decades from the past. Even in our own time periods, language changes usauge to what is correct or incorrect. Seems that political corrections was more their minds, than a true recounting of the story. Perhaps is would have been better stated as “This article is transcribed in the language usuage and spelling of the era.” The added remark of language that is not appropriate for today, is rather judgmental and condescending to the reader, placing their judgment on the use of particulars phrases or words as the final say of what is correct. Historical transcriptions of written accounts should appear as they were written and let us be the judge as to their appropriateness for our times.

    1. Good point.

  18. I think the disclaimer leading into the article is rather insulting to the readers of this written article. They are assuming that everyone does not understand that language we use today is different than that of decades from the past. Even in our own time periods, language changes usauge to what is correct or incorrect. Seems that political corrections was more their minds, than a true recounting of the story. Perhaps is would have been better stated as “This article is transcribed in the language usuage and spelling of the era.” The added remark of language that is not appropriate for today, is rather judgmental and condescending to the reader, placing their judgment on the use of particulars phrases or words as the final say of what is correct. Historical transcriptions of written accounts should appear as they were written and let us be the judge as to their appropriateness for our times.

  19. I don’t find a single thing here that would warrant your “please note” on the language. It is history. It is written in 1927. It contains the words slaves, negroes and whites. I don’t think any of your readers are snowflakes or prone to micro-aggressions and if they want to stay in their safe places, they certainly don’t need to read history!!!!

  20. My fifth ggrandfather was Clarke Crocker who moved to Perry County from Georgia. Family history has him presumably married to Ann Beason. As the story goes, Clarke Crocker also held church services in his home, as well as John Beason. He was a member of the Ocmulgee church from 1820 -1827. At least two of his sons, Leonard and Nathaniel, married in Perry County in the 1820’s. Mahala, his daughter married there too, without looking at my notes. They left Perry to continue on their migration to Texas, with a stop in Lauderdale County, MS, where Clarke Crocker died in 1854.

  21. I can’t believe it was torn down !!!!!!

    1. I’m the oldest of three brothers who got many a haircut in that building.

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