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The old county of Cahawba became Bibb County – here are some pioneers

With the removal of the Indians in 1814 by Andrew Jackson and his men, settlers began to migrate to the fertile Cahawba land that later became Bibb County, Alabama, even before the Federal survey of the land was completed.

Compiled records of BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA PIONEERS VOLUME II

Brierfield Grist Mill on Mahan Creek, photo taken ca. 1890
Brierfield Grist Mill on Mahan Creek, Bibb County, Alabama –  photo taken ca. 1890 (Alabama Department of Archives and History)

Farm clearings named after rivers and creeks

Small communities were generally farm clearings and were often named according to the location near a river, creek or the name of the family who predominated in the area. Churches and schools appeared early in 1817. By 1830, Bibb County’s population reached 6306 with lawyers, physicians, tradesman, architects, contractors, blacksmiths, wagon builders, millers, flatboat captains, peddlers, surveyors, ministers and many farmers according to the census.


The biographies in Compiled records of BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA PIONEERS VOLUME II are a few of the many pioneers and families who settled and helped develop Bibb County, Alabama prior to the 1850 census.

Browse the FREE SAMPLE pages (which includes a brief descendant outline in the first pages) on Amazon to see if this is your family line.

Biographies in Volume II include:
DR. JAMES H. or W. CRAWFORD
REBECCA HUEY DUFF
SARAH HUEY
SAMUEL W. DAVIDSON
FRANCES STRINGFELLOW
WALTER CARSON DUFF
REBECCA ELIZABETH HUGHEY
ALEXANDER HILL
JAMES JONES HILL
JANE CALVERT
PHAROUGH HILL
JESSE HILL

Some other descendant surnames include: AMBROSE, ARNOLD, AVERY, BAGBY, BARCLAY, BARNETT, BATES, BOLING, BOSCHUNG, BOWCOM, BROOKS, CALVERT, CHRISTENBERRY, CLEVELAND, COLLINS, COTTINGHAM, CROUCH, CURB, CURRY, DAILEY, DENTON, DICKEY, DRIVER, EDWARDS, ELAM, FAUCETT, FIELDS, FIKES, FONDREN, GOLSON, GOODEN, GOODSEN, GOODSON, GRAY, GREENWOOD, GRIFFIN, HARDIN, HENDERSON, HINES, HORTON, HUBBARD, HUEY, HUNT, JAMES, JEFFREYS, JOHNSON, KENNEDY, KYLER, LEE, LEVERT, LINT, LNU, LOCKARD, LOCKWOOD, LUNSFORD, MARTIN, MASSENGALE, MASON, MCGREGOR, MCKINNEY, MCLEAN, MCMATH, MEIGS, MOORE, MOREN, MOTLEY, NICHOLS, OLDHAM, PETERS, PITTS, POWELL, PRENTICE, RAGSDALE, REYNOLDS, RILEY, ROAN, ROSS, RUBIO, SCHOOLAR, SMITHERMAN, SPARKS, STEELE, STEWARD, STONE, SUMNERS, THOMASON, ROZELLE, THOMPSON, TIDMORE, VANELL, WALLACE, WARD, WEBB, WEISINGER, WHITE, WILSON,WINTERS

 

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Compiled records of BIBB COUNTY, ALABAMA PIONEERS VOLUME II


By (author): Donna R Causey
List Price: Price Not Listed
Kindle Edition: Check Amazon for Pricing Digital Only

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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7 comments

  1. Angela Atkins

    Does anyone have that book?

  2. Kearney Hall

    And by early 1830′ my family moved into Sumter County from NC.

  3. Jo Ann Gray

    This is sick how they removed the Indians off of there land,for the white mans benefit. The Indians should have been able to live there also. It was there’s to begin with. The Indians were the ones done so badly far as I’m concerned

    1. Should be Their’s not Theres.

  4. Richard Haynes

    I wouldn’t mind buying 10-15 acres of good land, with utilities available, with good water on it in Bibb. If you know of any land that’s available….shoot me an email. [email protected]

  5. Harold Wilson

    Elaine Smith Wilson

  6. […] first United States mail received at “Troy” was brought from Cahaba on horseback by S. G. Briggs, in September 1818, and opened in the store of Frederick Peck, the […]

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