Days Gone By - stories from the past

Some historic photographs & information of early 20th century Native Americans in Alabama

Below are some early Native American pictures at the Alabama Department of Archives and History. Can you add additional information about the photographs?


Choctaw Indian woman and babies Q8977Choctaw Indian women and babies ca. 1920 from History of Livingston, Alabama collection Q8977

Apache chief Myeta and Hannah Eskiminzin and family at the Mount Vernon Barracks in Alabama. May 8, 1893 – Author George Briggs Russell -Apache Indian photograph collection Q3655Apache chief Myeta and Hannah Eskiminzin and family at the Mount Vernon Barracks in Alabama. May 8, 1893 – Author George Briggs Russell -Apache Indian photograph collection Q3655

Huldah Ladd (Todd) Goode, of Cherokee descent (1802-1880) Q5218Huldah Ladd (Todd?) Goode, of Cherokee descent (1802-1880) On back of photograph: She was (according to legend) a very good woman—a doctor who did not turn anyone away. She used Indian herbs, delivered babies and other sickness—man or woman—black, red or white. Q5218

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Two elderly Yuma Indian women at San Carlos, Arizona. 1887 photographer C. A. Markey, San Carlos, Arizona. George Briggs Russell - Q3653Two elderly Yuma Indian women at San Carlos, Arizona. 1887 photographer C. A. Markey, San Carlos, Arizona. George Briggs Russell – Q3653

Unidentified man, possibly a relative of Timpoochee Barnard Q174; Q747

Unidentified man, possibly a relative of Timpoochee Barnard – image cropped and enhanced – This ambrotype was donated in 1910 by a woman who lived in Fort Mitchell and was a lifelong resident of Russell County, Alabama. She identified the man as Timpoochee Barnard, a Yuchi (Uchee) Indian chief. However, court cases demonstrate that Timpoochee Barnard died about 183201833, while the ambrotype process was not invented until 1853. Ambrotype is 2.5 x 3.5 inches. Q174Q747

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ALABAMA FOOTPRINTS – Settlement: Lost & Forgotten Stories (Volume 2)

About Donna R Causey

Donna R. Causey, resident of Alabama, was a teacher in the public school system for twenty years. When she retired, Donna found time to focus on her lifetime passion for historical writing. She developed the websites www.alabamapioneers and www.daysgoneby.me All her books can be purchased at Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. She has authored numerous genealogy books. RIBBON OF LOVE: A Novel Of Colonial America (TAPESTRY OF LOVE) is her first novel in the Tapestry of Love about her family where she uses actual characters, facts, dates and places to create a story about life as it might have happened in colonial Virginia. Faith and Courage: Tapestry of Love (Volume 2) is the second book and the third FreeHearts: A Novel of Colonial America (Book 3 in the Tapestry of Love Series) Discordance: The Cottinghams (Volume 1) is the continuation of the story. . For a complete list of books, visit Donna R Causey

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6 comments

  1. Winifred Allen Akridge

    Is this a part of the Rubye Pickens Tartt collection?

    1. Alabama Pioneers

      Click on the link to see more information.

  2. Heather Puckett

    Ken, have you seen this collection?

  3. My ancestors were Cherokee and creek/Choctaw Indian. I hope there will be more postings like these. The Wind clan of the creek.

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