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PATRON – There is a connection between this old pla film] ntation mansion and Auburn University. [old photographs film]

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18 comments

    1. Did you click on the title? It links to the site. Then there is a search box to insert your information.

  1. We need to find this place.

  2. Hi Donna, My grandmother was a Hunt from Russell County before she married. She had 6 brothers. It is said that one of her brothers went to Auburn, I don’t remember which one, but I think how exciting to be going at the beginning of it’s birth!

  3. Thank you for sharing notes and photos of the Ghost town ! Glennville. Alabama history hangs heavy in this “Gone With the Wind ” deserted site. It is treasured in the hearts & memories of only a few descendants of the former prominent & noble citizens. The lost graves only hint of the powerful & accomplished men and women who lived the short dream of Glennville’s days of glory. The founders of this dream town suffered hardship and privations and were in the end unsuccessful in establishing their cultured educated, and graceful community. They deserve our remembrance. I am a descendant of Rev Dr. Thomas Henry Dawson.

  4. Great photographs. Can one still visit the Glennville Plantation?

  5. Glennville Plantation still stands, but isn’t open to the public. You have to really look to find it because it’s hard to see from the road. It’s sits far back and there’s a lot of trees and vegetation blocking a clear view. It’s on the old 431. There is a historic marker. A cute gothic church is located to the left side of it which is no longer used. A few years back, I stopped and walked around that church to get a better view. The house appeared to be in fair to good condition, but the whole setting is a bit dreary and rather stark. Nothing around for miles.

  6. my mother misses glennville, she was born and raised there and wants to go back and see it again, it sounds like there is nothing to see, she left in 1951 her family was the daniels.

  7. Hi Donna, I’m a direct descendant of Malachi Ivey(great-great grandson) through his first marriage, to Caroline Jemima McTyeire. Does the Ivey Plantation still exist? Are there pictures of it? Is the Ivey-McTyeire cemetery still in existence and if so, is it hard to find? Thanks, John Ivey

    1. I’m sorry. I am unable to answer your questions. Perhaps someone who lives in the answer can answer them.

    2. Yes, I think the Malachi Ivey house probably is still standing, or it was in 1985 when I visited Glennville and Pittsview. It was a 1-story Greek Revival house with porch across the front and looked something like the Richardson-Comer house and others in the area. I can’t remember if it had Doric columns but think so, if not square box columns, but I don’t think Ionic. I think there are pictures in the book Pine Log & Greek Revival by William H. Davidson. I had this book (still have it somewhere) and I was thinking there were pictures of the Ivey house in it. The owners in 1985 were in their late 60s or early 70s and I believe had restored the house after their retirement. They collected antiques and books, possibly had operated an antique store or junk store because they had so many objects. They had floored the large attic and filled it with shelves and books also. They were not related to the Iveys but knew a lot of the history of the house and the Ivey family. I’m sure they must both be deceased now.

  8. Very interesting article.

  9. Wow!!!! This is amazing. My great grandmother (Martha Williams) worked for Mrs. Gertrude Thompson back in those days. Hopefully I will be able to take my mother for a visit soon. My mother has shared some interesting stories with me over the years. I would like to meet some of Mrs. Thompson relatives.

  10. […] Glennville Plantation also known as Elmoreland is truly a beautiful mansion. Click on this link and scroll to the bottom of the page to see more vintage pictures of Glennville and click to learn about the area’s connection to Auburn University. […]

  11. […] movement to establish the Auburn Masonic Female College, which opened in 1853, and Scott and the Reverend John Bowles Glenn encouraged the local congregation to establish the East Alabama Male College, a Methodist […]

  12. Enjoyed this post…..thank you…

  13. Looks like he wasn’t quite sure which end of the tennis racquet he should hold! 🙂

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