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PATRON – Do you believe this account of DeSoto’s march across Alabama is correct?

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31 comments

  1. […] resident Sequoyah devised the phonetic, written alphabet of the Cherokee […]

  2. The victor always writes the History.

  3. I found no disagreeable language contained herein.

  4. they claim to be related to the Jews, they have a lot in common

  5. Bought a pack of cigs once with that alphabet on them. I was at a pow-wow on the Univ. Of Ala. Quad. It was stupendous and a great, great event.

  6. […] an author ever had, or could desire. I mean by the authority of eye-witnesses. Among the expedition of Desoto were Five men, learned and reliable, each of whom kept a daily journal of the directions which the […]

    1. Did you ever read the dates that each came out about the so-called eyewitnesses?

      300 years later isn’t much of an eye witness and more than 25 years by an anonymous source not found till much later does not count either…

      I’ve discounted them entirely.

      The Carolinas and Georgia were still in OLD Alabama and the point of entry to find the boats has to make sense as well.

      No boats, no maps, not a single luxury – it’s as primitive as can be…

  7. […] county lies within the domain of the Creek Indians. It was traversed by De Soto in 1540 on his way to Cosa. Three miles southwest of Jacksonville on Tallaseehatchee Creek was the […]

  8. I know a Spanish Lancer was found in Lauderdale County. I have a picture of it.

    1. Where are you from, Alabama? My husband’s great grandmother was from Chilton County and last name Thames, she is a poach Indian I believe. I have Cherokee in me.

  9. I have been told that Sequoyah was one of my great grandfathers. My Grandfather was a Gist from Lauderdale County. Wish I could find out more!

  10. First DeSoto’s journey was 475 years ago not 340.
    If one truly wants to learn about his journey then read the account written by “the Incan”
    DeSoto and his men spent a good amount of time with Cosa, declined his invitation to take as much copper as he wanted, then as a going away gift left them small pox which decimated the population which had been quite large.

  11. Yes and no. Watch for the upcoming movie.

  12. There is a myth that he traveled warrior river in blount co??????

  13. […] Maubilla, the head town of Tuscaloosa’s domains was located within the borders of Greene County. DeSoto entered the county, crossing the Black Warrior River at or near old Erie, in the fall of 1540, […]

  14. The truth is Alabama History has always been littered in Fraud and Misrepresentation.

    That is, the State only exists as as long as it’s own ULTRA VIRES is allowed to persist.

    That said – the tale of DeSoto after years of research appears to be a made up yarn.

    Did you ever read the dates that each came out about the so-called eyewitnesses?

    300 years later isn’t much of an eye witness and more than 25 years by an anonymous source not found till much later does not count either…

    I’ve discounted them entirely.

    The Carolinas and Georgia were still in OLD Alabama and the point of entry to find the boats has to make sense as well.

    No boats, no maps, not a single luxury – it’s as primitive as can be…

    The simple reality is that the history of the US is told quite simply by John Marshall is Worchester v. Georgia.

    The story by A. B. Meeks is muddied by the Supreme Court casement was later involved with which provided the basis for his work which is claimed to be written about 30 years later about the TUSCALOOSA Chieftans.

    More people should do more research more of the time…

    Continuing the spread of fairy tales as actual history in the Age of the Internet is an interesting page to turn.

    The facts are due.

    Reality is stranger than fiction.

    No one ever considered what little good slaves are at $500-1000 each in a world that had no use of money yet since there were no fields to be plowed in the swamps of Alabama which was the only land that Georgia or the Carolina’s ever consisted of at such an early time…

    Nor the fact of the actual population which has always been overstated during these times are simply impossible.

    Then we have the number of English names attached to Native Americans or else people of other nationalities to makeup the difference.

    Example: In 1810 the entire Mississippi Territory consisted of 2250 people only and 450 white males.

    So… How many slaves would allow themselves to remain slaves under the control of 450 white males scattered over 100 milion acres of Alabama and Mississippi?

    Ok even if we reduce it to just 7 counties versus the entire MIss Territory…

    How many slaves will tolerate being slaves?

    How many men could afford to be soldiers?

    Where did this excess wealth come from?

    Since there was no road worth bein called a road just yet – how we’re thing moved from A to B effectively?

    Anyone have a clue yet?

    Look it up.

    Now history supposes the US started on the East Coast – Look it up…

    Have fun with it.

    There were only 2 towns of they can be called that up to a point and there records were not really burnt up in a fire….

    I understand there was some water damage once but not entirely destructive.

    1. There are not any dates on this page so I have no idea when you wrote this.

      I’d be interested in reading these things you mention if I knew where.

      I found this page because years ago, and I was looking for some mention again, I read a description written by someone who read the ancient Spanish logs of De Soto (or the guy Juan ??? after him) had wrote describing that they found natives with blue eyes.

      Since it looks VERY possible the vikings went down the east coast and down the Lawrence for maybe hundreds of years and that the Appalachians start in Nova Scotia, I bet those blue eyed vikings have descendants here and this is where the blue eyed natives possibly came from.

  15. This is the million dollar question. I’ve seen many variations of his route. Two things that strike me with this route is it showing he entered the state just east and slightly north of Attalla vs entering in the far north-eastern corner following the TN river near Bridgeport. Also, this shows Maubilla being much further west and slightly south of Selma. Until there is credible evidence, there will always be speculation. We may never know this answer.

  16. A Spanish lancer was found in Lauderdale county. I have a picture of it,

    1. Mary Carton you’re kidding!?

  17. “The Gold Disk of Coosa” by Virginia Pounds Brown is the story of a sixteen-year-old Indian boy during De Soto’ s travel across Alabama. It’s story is based on careful research and filled with authentic details. I read this book to several fourth grade classes and it never failed to make the few cold and boring facts in a textbook come to life.

    1. i don’t know of that’s the best or worst name I’ve ever read.

      I am going to look the book up though.

  18. Have now completed a veritable treasure trove of research on this matter.

    Most of these inconsistencies become irrelevant when classed with documentation that is certified by notarization of Federal and State documents that cover well over 240 years of history and then those same names are sometimes derived or are similar to those same names mentioned in the DeSoto Expedition.

    I’ve questioned the DeSoto tales for a while now – but I have not discounted the tale as a whole which does tie back to some names which miraculously still exist 200 plus year after 1540 and yet still exist the other 280 or so years till 2020.

    An odd thing to happen but coincidences are coincidences until such time as they are no longer coincidences.

  19. Intuitively, a lot of this historical narrative sounds like a mixture of some real history and pure BS, especially the parts about Cherokee Native Americans being all over Alabama. Most truthful historical and anthropological narratives confine the Cherokee to East Tennessee, Western North Carolina, and North Georgia. However, I am open to correction—-but the sources and evidence had better be of the highest academic quality and undeniable in nature.

  20. Absolutely not !! He went North of the river, not South !

  21. Good blog post. I absolutely love this site. Keep writing!